• Wednesday, November 21, 2018

Anti-Vietnam Sentiment against Vietnamese with Chinese Citizenship living in China

Discussion in 'China & Far East' started by VALKRYIE, Oct 9, 2015.

  1. VALKRYIE

    VALKRYIE FULL MEMBER

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    Oct 10th 2015 | QIAOGANG, GUANGXI PROVINCE

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    IN A restaurant in Qiaogang, a town in the southern province of Guangxi, a large poster of Mao Zedong—entitled “Red Sun”—hangs below one of a Vietnamese island where Wu Guangsui, the restaurant’s owner, was born. He fled to China by boat with his family in 1978 when relations between the once-friendly neighbours soured—resulting, the following year, in a brief but bloody war. Mr Wu (pictured), like some 300,000 other Vietnamese who sought refuge in China at the time, feared persecution in his home country for being a member of China’s ethnic majority.

    These refugees are among the very few outsiders who have legally settled in China. Then impoverished, China is now the world’s second-largest economy and aspires to be a global power. Its working-age population is shrinking, yet it remains stubbornly reluctant to accept new entrants; thousands fleeing persecution or conflict in North Korea or Myanmar in recent years have faced deportation by the Chinese authorities. Those sent back to North Korea have often been imprisoned and sometimes executed on their return.

    It was different with the Vietnamese. At the height of the exodus, 100,000 people entered China through the border town of Dongxing in Guangxi—ten times the local population (see map). Government buildings, homes and schools were emptied to shelter them. They were later settled in six provinces. In 2006 António Guterres, the UN’s High Commissioner for Refugees, described this as “one of the most successful integration programmes in the world”.

    [​IMG] The government gave the new arrivals housing and jobs, many of them in state-run farms or factories set up especially for the Vietnamese. Mr Wu was sent to fish in Qiaogang, which means “overseas Chinese port”. It was built as a new village for immigrants. Within a decade many of the Vietnamese had been issued with identity cards and the household-registration documents that entitle holders to government-subsidised education and welfare. Some were given Chinese passports. Most now have full rights as Chinese citizens. The government, however, still classifies them as refugees. It may believe that this will discourage other would-be migrants who are thinking of fleeing to China from believing they will enjoy the same benefits as those who came from Vietnam.

    Even the Vietnamese have had difficulties. Many are poorer than Chinese-born locals whose command of Mandarin and better contacts in southern China’s factory boomtowns have given them a leg up. Qiaogang is scruffy and decaying compared with the nearby city of Beihai, which has a forest of shiny new buildings. Some 50km (30 miles) inland at Liguang, one of the many “overseas Chinese farms” where Vietnamese were sent to work, former refugees now make up around a third of the population, but virtually all local businesses are Chinese-run; most Vietnamese remain on the land.

    That Mr Wu and most of his compatriots already spoke Cantonese, a language commonly spoken in Guangxi, helped their integration. They belonged to the same ethnic-Han group that makes up more than 90% of China’s population. But they are often still treated as outsiders, even though they have lived in China far longer than they did in Vietnam, and consider themselves Chinese. People in Guangxi refer to them—and their China-born children—as huaqiao, or overseas Chinese. When there are conflicts, says Su Chungui, a Vietnamese farmer in Liguang, townsfolk call them “Vietnam ghosts”. In 2013 Mr Su and some compatriots planted cassava on wasteland to supplement their tiny income. But Chinese villagers destroyed the whole crop before harvest-time, says Mr Su: “We are outsiders, so when we argue, we compromise.” The immigrants did not retaliate.

    The arrival of the Vietnamese was a turning point for a country that had long been shut off from most of the outside world, and that had experienced only outward flows since the Communists came to power: thousands of ethnic-Korean Chinese even fled to North Korea in the 1960s to escape famine. In 1979 the UN’s refugee agency, UNHCR, set up an office in Beijing. Three years later China signed the UN’s convention on handling refugees.

    Yet China has not yet passed its own laws reflecting the requirements of this treaty. It has no legal definition of a refugee. Aside from the Vietnamese, China has only 583 refugees on its books—most of them from Somalia and Nigeria. This year about 60,000 Burmese poured across the border into China to escape fighting between rebels and government forces. The Chinese government denied UNHCR access to the camps where they were briefly housed. Refugees from North Korea never even get shelter. China calls them “criminals” or “illegal economic migrants”—partly because it remains an ally of North Korea, but also because it fears attracting a lot more of them.

    This is less about immediate practicalities: the displacement of around 5m people by an earthquake in Sichuan province in 2008 proved that the government can provide emergency shelter and medical care for large numbers. China worries more about the impact on social stability of a large number of jobless immigrants of different ethnicity from the Han majority. It has little appetite (and cash-strapped local governments even less) for longer-term care. It may need to find one. Should North Korea sink into chaos, the exodus could dwarf the one from Vietnam (though if the regime collapses, many refugees would head to South Korea). China’s only visible preparations so far have been to tighten security along the border.


    http://www.economist.com/news/china...many-refugees-vietnam-it-ill-prepared-another
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2015
  2. VALKRYIE

    VALKRYIE FULL MEMBER

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    Maggie Q - born and raised in Honolulu, Hawaii. Her father is of Irish and Polish descent and her mother is a Vietnamese.
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    Mary Jean Reimer (Yung Jing-Jing) - Born in Vietnam to American and Chinese/Vietnamese parents
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    Christy Chung- Born in Canada to a Chinese-Vietnamese father and a Vietnamese mother.
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    Ray Lui Leung-wai - Hong Kong actor left Vietnam in 1967. Born to Hoa parents and grew up in Vietnam.
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    Tsui Hark - Hong Kong director, screenwriter - Born and grew up in Vietnam to Hoa parents.
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    François Huỳnh (黃長發) - Born in Hong Kong, Hoa parents (Teochew) from Vietnam.
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    Stefan Wong also known as Stephen Huỳnh. Born in Hong Kong, Hoa parents (Cantonese ) from Vietnam.
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    Last edited: Oct 10, 2015
  3. VALKRYIE

    VALKRYIE FULL MEMBER

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    Lai Ga Yi known as Gaile Lok. Fashion model, magazine cover girl and actress. Born in Macau to a Chinese father and a Vietnamese mother.
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    Linda Chung Ka-yan - Born in Canada to Hoa parents.

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    Chén Bǎolíng, also known as Pauline Chan. Actress, director, screenwriter and producer - Born and raised for 16 years in Vietnam.
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    Wong Kwok-hing - Hong Kong trade unionist and a member of the Legislative Council of Hong Kong. Born in Hai Phong, Vietnam.
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    Wan Kwong , also known as Jackson Wan Kwong, is a opera singer known as the "The Temple Street Prince". Born in Cholon, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.
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    Peter Van Tu Nguyen , Born in Vietnam is a Queen's Counsel from Hong Kong. He served as the Crown Prosecutor of Hong Kong between 1994 and 1997, and was the first Director of Public Prosecution of Asian descent in the territory. He went on to serve as a judge in the Court of First Instance of the territory's High Court in 1997 until retirement in 2008. He was succeeded by Grenville Cross as the Director of Public Prosecutions. He is now serving as a member of Torture Claims Appeal Board.
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    There are some successful Vietnamese in Hong Kong. Whether they are Hoa or Kinh I consider them all Vietnamese. Poor Vietnamese being treated badly as second class citizens should come back to growing VN.
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2015
  4. 大汉奸柳传志

    大汉奸柳传志 FULL MEMBER

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    No shit?I thought you were a racist obsessed with genes. :rofl:
     
  5. cnleio

    cnleio PDF THINK TANK: ANALYST

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    Disgusting ... 300,000 Vietnamese-Chinese as refugees, a good reason for war in 1979.
     
  6. tranquilium

    tranquilium SENIOR MEMBER

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    No shit? Low skilled refugee with limited work skill and limited command of the language isn't doing as well as the native born locals? Alert the press!
     
  7. Bussard Ramjet

    Bussard Ramjet SENIOR MEMBER

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    They were persecuted in Vietnam. Beaten, and their property looted. In the end, the VietCongs even charged fees for them to leave the country. No body in the diaspora that is Vietnamese Chinese, ever recognizes themselves with Vietnam. Chinese is their cultural heritage, along with whatever citizenship they are holding.

    Chinese all across SE Asia are persecuted. China should seriously give them citizenship.
     
  8. Rechoice

    Rechoice BANNED

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    Chinese Deng thought that Hua chinese controlled 70 % Vietnam economy after Vietnam war, so without Chinese vietnam should been collapsed under attacks of Khmer Rouge. So china has called them to turn back to the homeland.

    Good policy of Deng Xiaoping.
     
  9. Viet

    Viet ELITE MEMBER

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  10. cnleio

    cnleio PDF THINK TANK: ANALYST

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    LOL ... that's VCP teaching u ? It's 1978 Vietnam anti-Chinese riots to force 300,000 Vietnamese-Chinese leave their houses in Vietnam, ur ppl did the same anti-Chinese riot in 2014 when China oil rig in SCS.

    Deng ask 300,000 Vietnamese-Chinese return China, and they do it ? Only Vietnamese believe such joke, this's 300,000 refugees from Vietnam not 3,000 ... and i ever watch news report about those Vietnamese-Chinese villages in China GuangXi, why they all say Vietnamese force them to leave in the poor time ?
    JP00009261b.jpg
     
  11. TaiShang

    TaiShang ELITE MEMBER

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    The title of the above article:

    Almost home


    China has successfully absorbed many refugees from Vietnam. But it is ill-prepared for another influx
     
  12. Sanchez

    Sanchez SENIOR MEMBER

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    Viets rubbed their money and drove them away. What a shame to recognize them as Viet relevant! It's too bad for Vietnam that China is at your throat!
     
  13. Rechoice

    Rechoice BANNED

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    every Hanoi people known the story made by China about "Nan Qiu", in the same time when Khmer Rouge had attacked on our southern border, my neigbor he is Hua, he has secretly sold his house and disappeared.

    China has made a good plan to support your friends, Khmer Rouge.
     
  14. Bussard Ramjet

    Bussard Ramjet SENIOR MEMBER

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    Immigration is very important for a country to get a new energy. Immigrants, especially the ones that have been prescreened for talent are usually hard working, and entrepreneurial, and above all, they bring a different mindset to the one prevailing in the society.

    Just check out American silicon Valley companies and their founders. You will get the idea.

    Finally, if China doesn't want to rely on immigrant population, it must quickly relax, and rather promote child births.

    China's actual, unadjusted TFR is about 1.2, with the adjusted TFR being 1.6
     
  15. Place Of Space

    Place Of Space SENIOR MEMBER

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    Why you guys still butt hurt about Khmer Rouge? Two wrongs don't make one right. No matter how evil of Khmer Rouge, Vietnam still did very very wrong and imprudent invading Cambodia. I have said it many times, after 1975 unification, Vietnam started the new policy Đổi mới, Vietnam wouldn't experience later suffers.