What's new

Ancient Buddhist history and architecture of Pakistan

Sainthood 101

SENIOR MEMBER
Jul 24, 2021
6,656
1
8,889
Country
Pakistan
Location
United States
This thread is about discussing Buddhist history of Pakistan and civilizations associated with it
I'll start with an article and than post pictures of ancient sites, temples, universities
Encountering architectural riches while travelling through Gandhara, the land of forgotten Buddhist relics
https://www.firstpost.com/long-read...and-of-forgotten-buddhist-relics-9268301.html

It was with a sense of awe that I journeyed through the vast Gandhara, to the quiet and forsaken abode of the Buddha where mystery still wraps its ruins.


Made up of the present-day north-western Pakistan and eastern and north-eastern Afghanistan, the green valleys of the Indus, the Kabul rivers and their tributaries, while also lying along the pleasant foothills of the Hindu Kush ranges, these ruins of the ancient monasteries have presented astonishing statuary art, paintings, rare manuscripts and inscriptions from their depths.

A peep into the heritage sites and museums of Pakistan and Afghanistan gives an idea of the beauty of Gandhara’s architectural wealth. The rare Buddha colossi, bejewelled bodhisattvas and intricately carved Jataka stories on stair risers at Gandharan sites — now reposing in the museums of Kabul, Peshawar, Taxila and Lahore — make up just a fraction of the incredible art discovered here during archaeological excavations.

Sadly, most ancient sites of Gandhara that once bustled with life and vigour, forming the hub of art, history and culture, have now become objects of human greed. Encroached and built over, they are fast becoming a thing of the past. Hundreds of Buddhist sites in this wondrous region have been crumbling into mounds over which village settlements have come up. Illegal mining and trafficking of precious antiquities at the hands of unscrupulous miners, traders and builders have also been responsible for the destruction and death of the historical sites.

In Afghanistan, the impending destruction facing the 2,000-year-old Buddhist city of Mes Aynak around the Baba Wali mountains at the hands of the Chinese mining company MCC is of great concern. The contract involves extraction of the world’s largest copper reserves in large open-cast mines, posing an environmental threat with possibility of extinction of the heritage site and historical and religious treasures buried in the mountains.

Bamiyan in the Bamiyan Valley and Kakrak and Foladi sites in the Kakrak and Foladi valleys respectively, speak of the glory of ancient Afghanistan. Even today, a visitor to these valleys can savour the remnants of paintings, stucco sculptures, intricate ceiling and wall art, and the gigantic silhouette of ‘Lokottara’ in the honeycomb of rock-cut shrines and monastic cells. However, the dark empty niches of the Buddha colossi, standing like gigantic black pillars against the backdrop of the snow-laden Hindu Kush, remind one of the most sordid and gruesome event in the history of Buddhist heritage, when the giant Buddhas were blown up in March 2001 by the Taliban.

The splendid decoration of the caves of the Buddha colossi and the soffit of its vault are fortunately still alive, but only in the records of the Bamiyan Information Bureau and Archaeological Survey of India's [ASI] publication Bamiyan: Challenge to World Heritage.

The renowned Naubahar of Balkh, the ‘Little Rajgriha’ of Xuanzang, and one of the most splendid monasteries of the Buddhist world have not been seen in recent times. I was only a few kilometres from Balkh at Mazar-i-Sharif when a massive blast blew up the road to the site. However, another Naubahar in the neighbouring city of Aibak, Samangan, 118 kilometres from Mazar, was my focus. Here, the famous Top-e-Rustam and Takht-i-Rustam (stupa and the monastery, respectively) have been well preserved with an immense rock-cut stupa, pradakshinapatha, exotic pillared galleries, decorated shrines and ablution kunds.

1612360011_Gandhara-3-1920.jpg

Colossal Buddhas, bodhisattvas, rare coins and paintings recovered from several Buddhist cities in and around Kabul, and displayed at the National Museum of Afghanistan, are a scholar’s delight. The antiquities were unearthed during excavations in the 19th-20th century at the monastic site of Sarai Khuja, Paitava, Shotorak , Goldarrah, Tepe Maranjan,Tepe Narenj, Shewaki Stupa and monastery, Tope Darra or the Valley of Stupas near Istalif, and the Stupa at Tapa Iskandar.

Some of the most beautiful and well preserved monasteries of Asia are located in Pakistan, in and near Taxila and at Mardan in the Punjab and the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa regions.

Perched on the top of the hills and home to rare Buddha images and superbly embellished stupas, Jaulian, Pipplan, Mohra Moradu and Dharmarajika are some of the most beautiful and well-preserved monastic sites at Taxila, and are listed as UNESCO World Heritage Sites. The monuments are dated to the Kushan period between the 1st and the 2nd centuries CE. Dharmarajika Stupa is considered one of the earliest Buddhist monuments at Taxila built, around the 3rd century BCE, during the reign of the Mauryan emperor, Asoka.

The most well-preserved monastery yet seen on the Asian Silk Road is the UNESCO Heritage Site of Takht-i-Bahi, dating back to the 1st-2nd century CE. The site has many peculiarities and seems to be the main monastic location of Gandhara, where a large multitude of scholars and monks resided. The underground chamber with separate meditational cells is evidence that very senior monks and scholars lived here.

However, the same cannot be said about other monastic sites. At Jamalgarhi in Mardan, the focus of the establishment is the circular stupa, of which only the circular base remains. One can barely trace the eroded pilasters, niches and missing figures. A ring of roofless chapels that were erected to hold standing images of the Buddha and bodhisattvas lie empty, as their images have been pilfered.

Peshawar the renowned Kanishka Stupa is lost in a maze of graves and all efforts to find it have failed. At the Hissara village in Charsadda, which was once part of the expansive site of Pushkalavati — the 6th-century BCE capital of Gandhara — the ancient fortress has now turned into layers of glistening yellow earth. Within the ruins, one can trace the entrance towers, galleries and guard quarters. Marvellous pieces of statuary art recovered from mounds around Hissara are now housed at the Peshawar Museum.

At Sahri Bahlol, the high mounds of the renowned monastic establishment has been totally occupied and encroached upon by villagers. At the remote but historic village of Sikri across the Kalpani stream, no trace remains of its Buddhist history. A severely damaged stupa found there has been restored and put on display at the Lahore Museum.

It is heartening to note that the Afghan Institute of Archaeology in Kabul, and the Department of Archaeology and Museums of Pakistan are carrying out new excavations and conservation in their respective regions and taking steps to prevent illegal mining of Buddhist treasures.

Afghan, Japanese and French archaeologists and conservators are at Bamiyan taking special care of cave paintings, while also conducting further research and explorations. Marvellous statuary art has been recovered during new excavations at Mes Aynak and Tepe Narenj near Kabul.

Similarly, excavations at the historic villages of Sawal Dher in Mardan, Mian Khan in Katlang, and Koi Tangey Kandaray have revealed Buddhist antiquities from the 2nd-3rd century BC. Recently, Pakistan unveiled the remains of a 1,700-year-old, 48-feet-long Sleeping Buddha dated 3rd century CE at Haripur. According to Dr Abdul Samad, director of the Archaeology and Museums Department, it is the world’s oldest Sleeping Buddha.

As a thousand more Buddhas wait to be dug out from buried monasteries of Gandhara, the essential task before the world now, is to protect and preserve the forgotten cities and their treasures.

@Joe Shearer ,@Talwar e Pakistan , @-blitzkrieg-, @jus_chillin ,@Indus Pakistan

Mohra moradu - Buddhist monastery near taxilla (Pindi/Islamabad)
taxila-archaeological-site-unesco-world-heritage-site-pakistan-silk-road-south-asia-2BJN6K6.jpg

buddha-statues-of-jaulian-stupa-ancient-city-of-taxila-jaulian-haripur-district-khyber-pakhtun...jpg

statue-buddha-jaulian-ruined-buddhist-monastery-haripur-pakistan-unesco-world-heritage-site-st...jpg

taxila-mohra-muradu-stupa-and-monastery-pakistan-2HG833P.jpg

stucco-head-of-the-buddha-from-mohra-muradu-in-taxila-gallery-of-gandhara-national-museum-of-p...jpg

images (20).jpeg

Taxila.jpg

640px-Mohra_Moradu_sculpture.jpg
 
Last edited:

Sainthood 101

SENIOR MEMBER
Jul 24, 2021
6,656
1
8,889
Country
Pakistan
Location
United States
Taxila – Mohra Moradu
Mohra-Moradu-Taxila-Gandhara-1.jpg

This is Mohra Muradu, one of Taxila’s historic Buddhist ruins. It’s actually a mysterious sounding name, but the ruins of Gandhara’s monastery and stupa is simply taken from the nearby village, Mohra Muradu.
This picture shows the main stupa square platform, which is 4.75m (15.6 ft) tall
Mohra-Moradu-Taxila-Gandhara-Stupa-Buddha-relief.jpg

Mohra Muradu has two stupas. There is a main stupa and a smaller stupa to the south of it, and there are stucco statues (decorative stucco) of Buddha and elephants which remain preserved on the walls.
Mohra-Moradu-Taxila-Gandhara-3.jpg

The monastery has 27 cells on all four sides of a square courtyard, and some of them have stairs, so you can see some had additional levels. The central part of the garden is empty, possibly used for ceremonial baths.
Mohra-Moradu-Taxila-Gandhara-4.jpg

This is a preserved Stucco Buddha statue (decoratively lacquered) in the monastery. The coloring remains despite the many years that have passed
Mohra-Moradu-Taxila-Gandhara-6.jpg

The highlight and masterpiece of Mohra Muradu is this 4m (13 ft) tall monumental votive stupa. Found in a small cell of the monastery, it is a hemispherical bowl on a circular platform, with a flat box-shaped fixture on it (probably a place to store a sarira, a container holding the Buddha’s remains). And on top, is a decorative 7-layered umbrella-shaped structure.
When you have so many layers, it doesn’t even really look like an umbrella, but it was a must-have item during the Buddha’s day. When a king or nobleman was outside, servants held an umbrella over by his head. It became a symbol of respect as well for Buddha, and the believers donated umbrella covers stacked to the top.
Mohra-Moradu-Taxila-Gandhara-5.jpg

This is the 5 layer circular platform of the votive stupa. Each panel on the sides is separated by Corinthian columns (influenced by the Greeks) and decorated with carved reliefs of Buddha.
Also supporting at the base, is the elephant and the Greek god Atlas, who was said to “carry the sky at the west end of the world.”
 
Last edited:

Joe Shearer

PROFESSIONAL
Apr 19, 2009
26,687
161
43,807
Country
India
Location
India
Made up of the present-day north-western Pakistan and eastern and north-eastern Afghanistan, the green valleys of the Indus, the Kabul rivers and their tributaries, while also lying along the pleasant foothills of the Hindu Kush ranges, these ruins of the ancient monasteries have presented astonishing statuary art, paintings, rare manuscripts and inscriptions from their depths.
These were parts of the Achaemenid Empire, the earliest dates for which we have historical information; earlier than that we have only archaeological remains, that show the slow movement of agriculturists from these highlands down the slopes to their east, to the valley of the Indus, where they intermarried with the hunter-gatherers who formed the population of the sub-continent, and produced the people who established the Indus Valley Civilisation.

In Achaemenid times, these areas from the article were Bactria, Gandhara, Sattagydia and Hindush. The map below might help. Sadly, Hindush is not marked.

1646298395281.png


@Sainthood 101
May I continue?
 

Sainthood 101

SENIOR MEMBER
Jul 24, 2021
6,656
1
8,889
Country
Pakistan
Location
United States
These were parts of the Achaemenid Empire, the earliest dates for which we have historical information; earlier than that we have only archaeological remains, that show the slow movement of agriculturists from these highlands down the slopes to their east, to the valley of the Indus, where they intermarried with the hunter-gatherers who formed the population of the sub-continent, and produced the people who established the Indus Valley Civilisation.

In Achaemenid times, these areas from the article were Bactria, Gandhara, Sattagydia and Hindush. The map below might help. Sadly, Hindush is not marked.

View attachment 820345

@Sainthood 101
May I continue?
Ofcourse lol, it's so damn interesting
I'd love to hear more



This is the oldest Buddhist temple in the world
older than anywhere in India, China or even Buddhist countries
Situated in Swat Khyber pakhtunkhwa
kKmDQHJcpet89dqwQduchU.jpg

61bfe7ba43614.jpg

https://www.livescience.com/early-buddist-temple-pakistan
This may be one of the oldest Buddhist temples ever discovered
 
Last edited:

Joe Shearer

PROFESSIONAL
Apr 19, 2009
26,687
161
43,807
Country
India
Location
India
@Sainthood 101
May I continue?
Ofcourse lol, it's so damn interesting
I'd love to hear more
So you'd have read the blurb on Livescience.com, the one below:
Archaeologists think that the temple dates from about the middle of the second century B.C., at a time when Gandhara was ruled by the Indo-Greek kingdom of northern India, and that it was built above an earlier Buddhist temple that may have dated from as early as the third century B.C.

That means people would have built the older temple within a few hundred years of the death of the founder of Buddhism, Siddhārtha Gautama, who lived in what is now northern India and Nepal between about 563 B.C. and 483 B.C.


So what happened, between 483 BCE and the middle of the second century BCE (that's 150 BCE for us poor mortals)? That's a very neat 333 years.

Actually tons of things happened.

First, let's get it on board that the majestic Persian Empire was practically a pensioner of these 'Indian' provinces (I know @Indus Pakistan will be looking suspiciously at this, so let's agree right up front that this was coterminous Pakistan!). Just take a look, and be prepared to go and smack IK in the face with this graphic:

1646301922429.png


THE BULK OF THE ACHAEMENID REVENUE CAME FROM THESE THREE PROVINCES.

Herodotus talks of ants that mined gold, and gave the province of Hindush huge amounts of revenue to be paid as tribute, but given that even a thousand years earlier, people from this region had had a flourishing trade with Dilmun (=Bahrain) and its hinterland, it doesn't take a PhD in ancient (co-terminous Pakistan) history to guess that trade accounted for the huge sums swirling around.

These were parts of the Achaemenid Empire, the earliest dates for which we have historical information; earlier than that we have only archaeological remains, that show the slow movement of agriculturists from these highlands down the slopes to their east, to the valley of the Indus, where they intermarried with the hunter-gatherers who formed the population of the sub-continent, and produced the people who established the Indus Valley Civilisation.
In Achaemenid times, these areas from the article were Bactria, Gandhara, Sattagydia and Hindush. The map below might help. Sadly, Hindush is not marked.

View attachment 820345

@Sainthood 101
May I continue?
But we've gone far, far ahead of where we ought to be, and what ought to be.

How come the Indus Valley Civilisation produced such brilliant city planning, such meticulous construction material (all bricks used were of the same standard size), and such an evolved trading and commercial system, and huge public buildings, but we have wise people saying that this EARLIEST temple-equivalent (it wasn't a temple, more like what is known as a reliquary in the western world, where a great religious figure's mortal remains were stored) was around 150 BCE. What happened in between?
 
Last edited:

Joe Shearer

PROFESSIONAL
Apr 19, 2009
26,687
161
43,807
Country
India
Location
India
Above all, from 0 to 100 in 3 seconds is great in a MacLaren, but rather unsettling in studying history.

From having nothing, how did we get to sculptures where the stone looks like fine drapery? Look at this:
1646302621192.png


That's STONE??????

Jehosophat.

How did they do that?

Two different streams of events happened in that interval.

This is south Asia we are talking about, so no prizes for guessing that one stream was political, and the other was - wait for it! - religion.

Wottay surpriaze, Sir-jee? Whoda thunk it?

More when you want it.
 
Last edited:

Sainthood 101

SENIOR MEMBER
Jul 24, 2021
6,656
1
8,889
Country
Pakistan
Location
United States
This one will truly blow our minds and make you realize how important a place ancient Pakistan was for Buddhist religion

hqdefault (3).jpg

"Temple of Sacred Tooth is one of the popular Buddhist temples in Sri Lanka and is popularly known as Sri Dalada Maligawa in Sri Lanka. The temple of Sacred Tooth is situated in the royal complex in the city of Kandy in Sri Lanka. The City Kandy was an ancient kingdom during the lifetime of Lord Buddha. The temple of Sacred Tooth is considered quite important since this temple holds the relic of the real tooth of the Lord Buddha. Sri Dalada Malagawa is believed to hold the left upper canine tooth of Lord Buddha. The relics of Buddha sacred tooth hold quite important role in the political reign in Sri Lankan Government since it is believed that whoever holds the relic of the sacred tooth of Lord Buddha holds the power of government of the country."

nearly a million travellers visit the tooth relic temple every year

as
its obvious thier are only 4-5 of these teeths in the entire world
One is in Sri Lanka where millions visit to see the ancient relic

Other 3 were in Pakistan (including some bones of Buddha as the myth goes)- one was donated to Japan (I think they didn't realize the significance of it or didn't appreciate it enough)
Now we only have 2 left

Buddha-Weekly-buddhist-relic-taxila-Buddhism.jpg

These precious relics of the Buddha, preserved by the Great Ashoka, are found in the Taxila Museum in Pakistan. Recently, the government sent them on a tour to other countries.

They're sitting somewhere in a random museum where there's no one to appreciate or take care of them in a proper manner
 

Taimoor Khan

ELITE MEMBER
Jan 20, 2016
13,856
4
21,510
Country
Pakistan
Location
United Kingdom
Its only natural. Pakistan is the world most ancient civilization. Its influences are everywhere though out of jealously other nations will never recognise.

How many people know that Buddhism was introduced to Korean peninsula by a Monk (ancient Pakistani) from Gandhara?



According to some historians, Korea’s Buddhism traces its roots to the Gandharan Civilization that thrived 2,000 years ago in the territories of today’s northern Pakistan and Afghanistan.

The Mahayana school of Korea’s Buddhism ― one of two main branches alongside the Hinayana school ― was introduced to the ancient Kingdom of Baekje (B.C. 18-A.D. 660) in 384 by monk Maranatha, native of Gandhara, the historical records say.
 

Sainthood 101

SENIOR MEMBER
Jul 24, 2021
6,656
1
8,889
Country
Pakistan
Location
United States
Its only natural. Pakistan is the world most ancient civilization. Its influences are everywhere though out of jealously other nations will never recognise.

How many people know that Buddhism was introduced to Korean peninsula by a Monk (ancient Pakistani) from Gandhara?



According to some historians, Korea’s Buddhism traces its roots to the Gandharan Civilization that thrived 2,000 years ago in the territories of today’s northern Pakistan and Afghanistan.

The Mahayana school of Korea’s Buddhism ― one of two main branches alongside the Hinayana school ― was introduced to the ancient Kingdom of Baekje (B.C. 18-A.D. 660) in 384 by monk Maranatha, native of Gandhara, the historical records say.
I started using this word recently as it makes Indians absolutely furious :lol:
thats-the-way-aha-aha-dlike-it-imgflip-com-i-like-50613952.png

I enjoy watching angry Indians
 
Last edited:

Taimoor Khan

ELITE MEMBER
Jan 20, 2016
13,856
4
21,510
Country
Pakistan
Location
United Kingdom

Sainthood 101

SENIOR MEMBER
Jul 24, 2021
6,656
1
8,889
Country
Pakistan
Location
United States
340px-Statue_of_a_Buddha_seated_on_a_lotus_throne_in_Swat_Valley.jpg

Statue of a Buddha seated on a lotus throne in Swat, Pakistan.
Avalokitesvara_bronze_Gandhara._Musée_des_arts_asiatiques_Guimet.jpg

Gilgit Baltistan​

Buddhism came to Gilgit Baltistan in the late 7th century when most of the masses were practicing the Bon religion. Before the arrival of Islam, Tibetan Buddhism and Bön, to a lesser extent, were the main religions in Baltistan. Buddhism can be traced back to before the formation of the Tibetan Empire. The region has a number of surviving Buddhist archaeological sites, including the Manthal Buddha Rock—a rock relief of the Buddha at the edge of the village (near Skardu)—and the Sacred Rock of Hunza. Nearby are former sites of Buddhist shelters.

Baltistan was Buddhist majority until the arrival of Islam in this region in the 15th century. As most of the people converted to Islam, the presence of Buddhism in this region has now been limited to archeological sites, with the remaining Buddhists moving east to Ladakh, where Buddhism is the majority religion.
Bronze statue of Avalokiteśvara Bodhisattva from Gandhara. 3rd–4th century.
Gautama_Buddha_statue_(5th_century_CE).jpg

Buddha from the Kahu-jo-daro stupa displayed in Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya.
400px-Cave_city_Gondhrani.jpg

https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Buddhism_in_Pakistan

Well preserved ancient Stupas of Pakistan
440px-A_Vihara_of_Buddhism_in_Swat_KPK_Pakistan.jpg

Gumbatona stupa, Swat, KPK, a rare example true domed stupa 1st or 2nd century AD
Amlukdara_stupa_close (1).JPG

Amlukdara stupa

These walls represent a relgious storyline
01.15.jpg

BHUDHA.jpg

20180217_154321.jpg
@Joe Shearer aren't Pandavas Hindustani people? not to sure how correct this is
Would love to know if there's a record of pandavas ever visiting these salt range areas of Punjab (going by mythology)
Very cool if true
 
Last edited:

Sainthood 101

SENIOR MEMBER
Jul 24, 2021
6,656
1
8,889
Country
Pakistan
Location
United States
a-bodhisattva-pakistan-ancient-gandhara-2nd-3rd-century.jpg

Buddha-Weekly-Gandhara-Buddha-Taxila-Buddhism.jpg

A famous Buddha sculpture in the Taxila Museum, Pakistan in the Gandhara style.

Buddha-Weekly-Dharmarajika_stupaTaxila-Buddhism.jpg

The Dharmarajika Stupa in Taxila, Pakistan.

Buddhist legacy in Pakistan — Gandhara heritage​

Siddhartha Gautama, later revered as the Buddha, spread his teachings on the Indian subcontinent as long ago as 2600 years. Buddhism spread around Pakistan, Afghanistan, and India. [See map Note 3.] In what is today modern-day Pakistan and other areas, the famous Buddhist ruler Ashoka the Great (304 to 232 BCE) spread Buddhism and Buddhist monuments and art throughout the region. (Gandhara Civilization 1500 BCE to 515 CE.)

Buddha-Weekly-Akshobya-the-Great-Buddhism.jpg

An gorgeous stone relief of Akshobya the Great, who spread Buddhism throughout the sub-continent.

Buddha-Weekly-Map-of-Gandhara-Buddhism-1.jpg

Historical map visualizing Gandhara in Ancient times.

Major Buddhist sights and artifacts​

Taxila, in modern-day Punjab, Pakistan, is particularly important, because the Buddha himself travelled and taught in this part of the country. The city was a Buddhist centre for learning, architecture, sculpture, and art for over 1000 years.

Buddha-Weekly-Buddha-Taxila-Museum-Pakistan-Buddhism.jpg

Stunning sculpture of Buddha in the Taxila Museum.

Taxila Museum artifacts​

The artifacts in the Museum have been discovered from various sights in Taxila in Punjab province are a must-visit for any Buddhist, or admirer of the faith or antiquities. The attractions include the Bhir Mound (600-200 BCE), Dharmarajika Stupa and Monastery (300 BCE – 200 CE), Sirkap (200 BCE – 600 CE), Jaulian Monastery (200 – 600 CE) and Jandial Temple (c.250 BCE). The Sirkap city contains a round stupa which is considered to be one of the oldest in the subcontinent. The nearby Dharmarajika Stupa dates back to the 2nd century CE and is particularly noteworthy as it was built to house bone fragments of Lord Buddha.

Lahore Museum — a trove of Buddhist art​

Staying in Punjab province, the Lahore Museum boasts a treasure trove of Buddhist art from the ancient Indo-Greek and Gandhara kingdoms. The Museum has a miniature stupa in great condition as well as a plethora of historic relics, but its crown jewel is the Gandhara-era “Fasting Buddha”.

Buddha-Weekly-Lahore-Museum-Fasting-Buddha-Buddhism.jpg

One of the most famous statues of the Fasting Buddha is on display in the Lahore Museum in Pakistan.

Buddha-Weekly-Mansehra-Rock-Edicts-Pakistan-Buddhism.jpg

The Masehra Rock edict of Emperor Ashoka. These Buddhist edicts are found in several places in Pakistan.

Buddha-Weekly-Mohenjo-daro-Stupa-Buddhism.jpg

The Mehenjo Daro Stupa.
Buddhist remains are also present in the Sindh province. A stupa can be found in the historic Mohenjo-daro archaeological site. Mohenjo-daro was a settlement in the ancient Indus Valley Civilization and is considered one the world’s earliest and most advanced cities. The stupa here magnificently towers and looks over the ancient city.

(very interesting makes little sense but maybe this stupa is in the outskirts of Mohenja daro imo)

Buddha-Weekly-Mathal-Buddha-Rock-Buddhism.jpg

Mathal Buddha Rock Gilgit-Baltistan.

the Manthal Buddha Rock located near Skardu. This rock is engraved with a picture of the Buddha and is dated to be around from the 8th century. Other than this, the Sacred Rock of Hunza that is 30 feet high and dates back to the 1st Millennium AD can be found in Hunza, Gilgit-Baltistan.

Buddha-Weekly-Stupa-at-Jaulian-ruined-Buddhist-monastery-Haripur-Pakistan.-a-UNESCO-World-Heri...jpg

Stupa at Jaulian Buddhist Monastery (a UNESCO World Heritage Site).

Buddha-Weekly-Lahore-museum-exhibit-Buddhism.jpg



I hope people can notice how these statue are very much Greek inspired and are similar in style to what we find in ancient Greek statues from that era
 
Last edited:

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Total: 1, Members: 0, Guests: 1)


Top Bottom