What's new

AC Sialkot controversy: Dr Firdous Awan says public representatives are answerable to the masses

SQ8

ADVISORS
Mar 28, 2009
34,632
389
71,640
Country
Pakistan
Location
Pakistan
i think pakistan need fully overhauling
presidential system
local gov system
and some new administration
I think Pakistan needs overhauling completely - lets take out Pakistanis(ship them to antartica or someplace) and bring in a mix of Scandinavians, Turks, Sri Lankans, Chinese, Filipinos and other good working skillsets to fix Pakistan.

Pakistan will be a G20 country in ten years - then whatever Pakistanis are left from their time in Antartica can be reeducated and brought back into their overhauled country.
 

Imran Khan

PDF VETERAN
Oct 18, 2007
59,284
2
117,070
Country
Pakistan
Location
Pakistan
I think Pakistan needs overhauling completely - lets take out Pakistanis(ship them to antartica or someplace) and bring in a mix of Scandinavians, Turks, Sri Lankans, Chinese, Filipinos and other good working skillsets to fix Pakistan.

Pakistan will be a G20 country in ten years - then whatever Pakistanis are left from their time in Antartica can be reeducated and brought back into their overhauled country.
i love penguins sir 🐧🐧🐧
 

Mentee

ELITE MEMBER
Feb 3, 2016
8,898
1
21,187
Country
Pakistan
Location
Pakistan
I think Pakistan needs overhauling completely - lets take out Pakistanis(ship them to antartica or someplace) and bring in a mix of Scandinavians, Turks, Sri Lankans, Chinese, Filipinos and other good working skillsets to fix Pakistan.

Pakistan will be a G20 country in ten years - then whatever Pakistanis are left from their time in Antartica can be reeducated and brought back into their overhauled country.
Is it better to have a carpenter and whatever half hearted job he does or a guy , in this case our babus, with tools pretending to be one ?
 

Genghis khan1

BANNED
Aug 22, 2015
3,366
0
4,217
Country
Pakistan
Location
United States
Who Is Sonia Sadaf?

The BS-17, Assistant Commissioner Sialkot, is Masters in Public Administration from Cornell University, BBA Honors from the University of Central Punjab and BBA from University of Arkansas.

She passed the CCS Examination in 2017, securing 32nd position. Her batch mates and PTI leader from Sialkot Usman Dar has praised her for her devotion to her duty.


1620062926836.png

She passed the CCS Examination in 2017, securing 32nd position. Her batch mates and PTI leader from Sialkot Usman Dar has praised her for her devotion to her duty.





1620063264456.png


Sonia Sadaf '16
Sonia Sadaf ’16 is a Fulbright Scholar from Pakistan, pursuing her MPA at CIPA. She has done BBA Honors from University of Central Punjab. During her undergraduate studies, she spent one semester at University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, USA as an exchange student. She took a summer course in 2012 offered by UNDP in Europe on “Sustainable Human Development”. Before joining the YPA program, Sonia worked with Foreign Affairs Committee of the National Assembly of Pakistan. She has also worked with multinationals and NGOs as an intern and volunteer including Nestle Pakistan Ltd, NewsOne TV Channel, Care Foundation. Having keen interest in politics, social change, and public engagement, she has been actively engaged in different youth platforms in the country.

The Changing Dynamics of the US-Pakistan Relationship

Posted December 2, 2014 by Sonia Sadaf '16 under Blog, Opinion Editorial


With the anticipated date for the US withdrawal from Afghanistan coming closer and its increasing entanglement in dealing with the threat of ISIS, another glitch in Pakistan-US relations doesn’t seem totally improbable. The recent release of a Pentagon report accusing Pakistan of harboring militants casts a serious blow to the already confused state of relations, in spite of strenuous efforts on the part of the strategic dialogue between the two countries.

The US-led war on terror started as a direct reaction to the tragic incident of 9/11 and Pakistan, being the direct neighbor of the landlocked Afghanistan, was put in a conundrum because it was to decide whether it is up for the war as an ally or against it. The rational choice by General Pervaiz Musharraf was to affirm Pakistan’s support of the US and the allied force and launch a war to wipe out militants from Afghanistan.

To look into how the phenomenon of Talibanisation boiled up to such a level to pose a global threat, we would need to trace its roots back to the end of the Cold War. Islamic militant discourse and strategy emerged during the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan in the 1980s and the world’s reaction to aid militants to fight that war. Islamic militants got a massive amount of support from the West and the Middle East to fight the Soviet threat. They triumphed and accomplished their mission by expelling the Soviet forces in the late ‘80s, and the result was the dismantlement of the Soviet Union in the early 1990s. Once the job was done, the whole world turned its back on Afghanistan and left it unconsolidated. Taliban militants filled the gap and came into power, maintaining a stringent rule in the country for a decade.

Afghanistan again caught the world’s attention when 9/11 happened. By then, the Taliban regime had proliferated in Afghanistan, and it needed profound military power and political will to fix the mess and complete the undone job of consolidation.

Although Pakistan had entered into alliance with the United States as a ‘frontline ally’ in the war on terror, it needed to evolve its military and political strategy to fit the changing global order. Lack of quick capacity to seal its 2250 km porous border with Afghanistan and weak writ of the state on tribal areas let a huge influx of militants from Afghanistan into the bordering regions of Pakistan to seek refuge from the US attacks. Since then, they continued strengthening their position in Pakistan and even established local franchises like Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP).

The government of Pakistan has been cooperating with the United States by sharing intelligence, handing over suspected militants to the US, and providing logistical support by offering land routes to transfer fuel and supplies to the US bases in Afghanistan. Although Pakistan and the United States have been in a reluctant but required cooperation with each other since the very beginning of this war, the two countries could never eliminate the deficit of trust persistent between their military and political outfits. The divergence of opinion on issues like drone attacks has led to allegations of not fulfilling the duties of being an ally. In spite of continued repudiation from Pakistan of drone attacks, the United States has used drones as a strategic tool to counter terrorism without corroborating evidence of their effectiveness. A recent report on the CIA’s drone campaign in Pakistan indicates that over 2,300 people were killed by US drones, with only 704 of those dead people actually named and identified. Statistics released by the UK Bureau of Investigative Journalism pose a question on the efficacy of these drone strikes because they say that less than 4% of the drone victims were identified as members of Al-Qaeda, while the majority were children, women, the elderly, and other civilians who happened to be at the drone site at the wrong time.

The resulting tension between Pakistan and Afghanistan about lack of support in controlling attacks from one territory to the other is a powerful signal of how hard it will be for US forces to withdraw from the region as planned by the end of this year without risking future conflict.

No army in the world wants to engage in domestic counter-insurgency operations, pitching its gun power against its misdirected countrymen who for whatever inappropriate motives may choose to turn their weapons on their compatriots and the armed forces. Pakistan has undertaken a challenging and painful counter-insurgency campaign to defeat who want to implement their detestable agenda in Pakistan and elsewhere. Pakistan has successfully cleared Swat and South Waziristan in the previous years and the most recent operation, ‘Zarb-e-Azab’, was launched this June to clear militant hideouts in North Waziristan, one of the seven tribal agencies. Since June, over a thousand militants have been killed in the operation in an effort to wean locals from the clutches of terrorism. Pakistan’s army has lost roughly twice as many soldiers in the conflict with Taliban fighters as the US has.

This fight against terrorism has put a great toll on Pakistan with resultant issues of poverty, displacement, health, education, and economic insecurity. This turbulence has left millions of Pakistanis displaced from their homes. Pakistan is handling the Internally Displaced People (IDPs), whose number has reached over one million as a result of the recent operation.

With the increasing global context of the problem, Uzbek and Chechen fighters threatening Russia and Central Asia, and Uighurs threatening China, it has become more vital for the world community to support Pakistan in its efforts rather than accusing itThe threat is serious because Uzbek and Chechen attackers are traced in attacks in Pakistan, which testifies to how horrific this phenomenon is given the huge influx of fighters from around the globe to back ISIS in Syria and Iraq.

A lot more needs to be done by Pakistan to ensure that no foreign terrorist enters its territory and all the terrorist outfits found in the country are countered effectively, but it is a grim task which is underway. It is not an easy task to single out militants, who include locals who resorted to militancy as a result of various factors including poverty, lack of tolerance, unemployment, and inequality. It is an uphill task to deal with the root causes of extremism in Pakistan and it will take a long time to fix these problems with resources on one hand while countering terrorism with force on the other hand.

The whole world community needs to appreciate the sacrifices Pakistan has made during the war on terror. Pakistan has suffered a loss of $102.51 billion in direct and indirect economic cost during the war over the last thirteen years. Since 2001, Pakistan, a nation of 182 million, has been fighting for the future of the world’s 7 billion, because a Pakistan in turmoil has much greater implications than just a country in chaos. Historical ups and downs of the volatile relationship and the strategic significance of mutual coordination between the US and Pakistan testify to the fact that mutual cooperation, amid the backdrop of outspreading extremism, is more in the interest of both countries now than ever before. In such a delicate relationship, such accusations of Pakistan and a strategic tilt towards India might cause a damaging crack in the US-Pakistan relationship. If this state of mistrust prevails, it will become even more difficult to unwind the widening gulf between the two states in the coming years.
 

SQ8

ADVISORS
Mar 28, 2009
34,632
389
71,640
Country
Pakistan
Location
Pakistan
Is it better to have a carpenter and whatever half hearted job he does or a guy , in this case our babus, with tools pretending to be one ?
Babus are in every nation but they are overcome with a robust , hardworking and honest middle class.
Key word is honesty that is not looking for shortcuts to wealth or purpose of work.

Pakistanis in general are dishonest not just to others but to themselves in terms of effort and work. Take a drug addict for example, the amount of effort required for rehab and fixing habits takes a lot of dedication and consistency.
So apply that to changing national character (after all these babus and every other person being cursed out here on pdf - shalwar kameez with petticoat, suit or khaki uniform all come from the same gene pools) is nothing short of maddening work and unfortunately without a massive leadership revamp(who brings it? Since the leadership is usually replaced by other leadership which is either as/more incompetent and/or self centered ) there is nothing more to be done and this apathetic incremental “improvement”(more like adapted mediocrity) will continue to exist.

The only class capable of leading true change is the one that has always stepped up in most countries - the middle class. The poor are easily roused but also easily bought out and misled a their judgement is rarely better than their environment.

Pakistan doesn’t have nearly enough middle class and have none that are capable of rallying the classes below them for effective change. Hate them as you will or don’t - the only two middle class political movements MQM and PTI were hijacked by their own different demons. PTI has gone the way of the elite and MQM was lost to ethnic extremism and external influence.

The military is an elite class due to its leadership category.They cannot and will never be able to implement change due to this because their command structure (and rightly so) is to not question their leadership- whether they are selfish, incompetent or corrupt or not is irrelevant to 98% of the military and it still maintains the effectiveness of them as a viable body in general.

Moreover, it is unfair for the population to keep looking to this already streched body with its toes in everything to ask it to be competent at maintaining security as well as managing state bank - they cannot because it is not their professional training or expertise and will bungle it up eventually.

So, back to the only option - the educated middle class is the ONLY option for change in Pakistan and unless they all band together in majority to create change(do they have the patience and will after the loss of their platform in PTi to the same elites?) and take full ownership of it without messianic ideals (No Khans, Zardaris or Sharifs or elite business families) there will be no change and we will be seeing the same or worse conditions in Pakistan in 2040.
 

Mentee

ELITE MEMBER
Feb 3, 2016
8,898
1
21,187
Country
Pakistan
Location
Pakistan
S

Sonia Sadaf is 10x more capable and qualified person than jahil politicians.



Ive got not beef with that lady but for a general academic reference Plz make me understand as to how a bba graduate from university of central punjab can not only dictate but can also take part in formulating policies for a plethora of departments ranging from health to postal to railways to general policing to revenue to agriculture to highways to customs to i.t to --------- and every professional like a professor, doctor, prosecutor , engineer, post master , d.m , dpo etc must sit like a dodo infront of a "nature's gift" aka Pakistan administrative service and keep taking "guidance" from a jack of all ?


Going by your logic the first world should instantly abandon their right man for the job protocol and rather get the guidance from the utopia of south Asia .


"only" a pakistani would believe in his own make and believe magic wand fairy tale.
 
Last edited:

Genghis khan1

BANNED
Aug 22, 2015
3,366
0
4,217
Country
Pakistan
Location
United States
Ive got not beef with that lady but for a general academic reference Plz make me understand as to how a bba graduate from university of central punjab can not only dictate but can also take part in formulating policies for a plethora of departments ranging from health to postal to railways to general policing to revenue to agriculture to highways to customs to i.t to --------- and every professional like a professor, doctor, prosecutor , engineer, post master , d.m , dpo etc must sit like a dodo infront of a "nature's gift" to pakistan and keep taking "guidance" from a jack of all ?


Going by your logic the first world should instantly abandon their right man for the job protocol and rather get the guidance from the utopia of south Asia .


"only" a pakistani would believe in his own make and believe magic wand fairy tale.
Idk what are you trying to state, I am highlighting her credentials. She has a Master's in public policy from a world-renowned institution. Firdous ashiq Awan did not just disrespected Sonia but also disrespect ACs Office and the institution of Pakistan. Even if Awan had grievances, there is a time and place to discuss that. Not all ACs are the same. Plus jasi jahil awam hy, I do not even blame the other ACs.
 

H!TchHiker

SENIOR MEMBER
Aug 16, 2016
4,519
8
5,265
Country
Pakistan
Location
Saudi Arabia
These officers consider themselves as some type of successor of british raj..because of garmi and rush can't come on front...what was doing there then ?
 

Dr. Strangelove

SENIOR MEMBER
Apr 20, 2011
4,676
7
8,366
Country
Pakistan
Location
Pakistan
Government of Pakistan Sponsor's Post Grad Education for Civil servants i know a few who went to US and Australia for it. Its the people of Pakistan who pay for it. And babus all over the SM are acting like they join civil services after graduating from western Universities. Pathetic Leeches I say From now own publicly humiliate theses worthless fools every time Government gets a chance so they can at least feel some of the hurt that they put common folks through. Bloody Parasites.


Bureaucracy is continuously violating the government’s austerity drive by using its funds recklessly Buying Toyota Fortuners having seminars in 5 star hotels.
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Total: 1, Members: 0, Guests: 1)


Top Bottom