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A year later : Biden's Afghanistan exit decision looks even worse

INS_Vikrant

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Taliban mullah government. Ideological mullah governments are sovereign, independent and self respecting. They will create a state like the Iranian mullahs did.

Iran was already a a big powerful stable country with huge oil reserves when revolution happened. Compare it to Afghanistan which small poor landlocked barren country that has known nothing but invasion and civil wars for the last 40 years. Huge difference between the two.
 

Mohammad_2

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Iran was already a a big powerful stable country with huge oil reserves when revolution happened. Compare it to Afghanistan which small poor landlocked barren country that has known nothing but invasion and civil wars for the last 40 years. Huge difference between the two.
The difference between Iran and Afghanistan ( I better say Taliban ) is like the Sun and Earth. The Taliban will not last long, at least in this shape and form and the amount of territory which they control.
 

ghazi52

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The Afghan people waiting for smugglers in Calais​

By Sana Safi & Kawoon Khamoosh

BBC World Service


Rahmat stares out to sea



One year ago today, western countries led by the US pulled their troops out of Afghanistan, bringing an end to its longest war and 20 years of occupation.

The country was left in the hands of the Taliban and for the thousands of former government workers and security officers and their families who had been collaborating with international forces, they suddenly found themselves in fear of their lives. Many fled as refugees and still have no place to call home.


For their safety, all contributors names have been changed

"It's the first time I've ever seen the sea," says Rahmat.

Hailing from landlocked Afghanistan, 30-year-old Rahmat looks out across the channel waters. He watches the ships pass by the port of Calais.

But what should have been an exhilarating scene, his first time seeing an ocean, is crushed by fear.

Along with dozens of other Afghan men currently in Calais, Rahmat is waiting for a call from a smuggler, telling him it's time to cross.

"Looking out at the sea, it terrifies me. Like I'm staring death in the face," he says. "I wouldn't even be here if Afghanistan was safe."

According to the Home Office the number of Afghans trying to cross the channel to the UK has increased fivefold since the Taliban takeover this time last year. They now account for one in four people making the dangerous journey.


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Within days of the Taliban takeover people from Rahmat's village started to disappear. Their dead bodies, later appearing without any explanation.

"We had no way of knowing what really happened to them or who did it?"

In Kabul, the Taliban leadership announced a "general amnesty" for all government workers across the country and insisted they would be merciful towards those who opposed them.
However, in the last 12 months, several independent investigations by NGOs and media outlets have alleged to hundreds of killings and forced disappearances of former government officials and members of the security forces.

Rahmat believes the murders in his village were revenge killings, carried out by members of the Taliban against particular individuals who worked for or supported the former government.
The local Taliban denied this, saying it was individuals with links to the so-called Islamic state.

However, with Rahmat's father and two brothers, all former government workers, his family felt under threat. Fearing for his sons, Rahmat's father gave them all his blessing to all leave Afghanistan.

After months of travelling through Iran, Turkey and Serbia, Rahmat finally arrived in Calais in June. Upon which he met dozens of other Afghan men, all former government workers or security forces, and all trying to get to Britain.

Why the UK?​

Standing on derelict ground, on the edge of what was known as the Calais 'Jungle,' the refugee camp which was demolished in 2016, dozens of Afghans, all young men, stand chatting whilst charging their phones.

Asked as to why they want to reach the UK, they replied: "Our cases will be heard there."

"Or at the very least", one man says, " We'll be given somewhere to shelter from the rain."
All of the men discuss the Dublin Regulation, an EU law which states an individual's asylum application should usually be processed by the first EU country they arrive in.
Many say their fingerprints were first taken in Bulgaria. But claim after being badly treated by the local border police they say they didn't want to stay. Instead they pushed on to the UK where the Dublin regulation does not apply.
The Bulgarian authorities declined to comment.
Serving in the army for just two and a half years, Sajid (R) says he has lost countless friends in the conflict

Image caption,
Serving in the army for just two and a half years, Sajid (R) says he has lost countless friends in the conflict
To cross the channel, each of them has paid several thousand dollars to a network of smugglers to get them all the way from Afghanistan to Calais, and then on to the UK.
21-year-old Sajid served in the Afghan army. He fought on the frontline against both the Taliban and the so-called Islamic State.
He now spends all his days and nights sleeping under a tree in Calais, less than 60 miles from the port of Dover.
He was on duty, guarding a mountainous region close to the Pakistani border when he heard the news that Taliban had taken the country.

"I was ready to fight on until the last bullet," he says.

But his superiors ordered him to "lay down our weapons and go home."
Fighting off the tears, he says he's lost track of the number of friends he lost in battle.

"I had to leave. The Taliban won't leave us alone. They say there is a general amnesty, but it's not true," says Sajid.

"To this day, the retribution continues. Six people disappeared from my village. Many people have been killed," he says.

Rwanda?​

News of the UK's controversial policy to send asylum seekers to Rwanda, an intended deterrent to those making dangerous journeys to the UK to claim asylum, has also reached the Afghan's stuck in Calais.

23-years-old Hashim worked for the Afghan intelligence services. He too says he lost colleagues within weeks of the Taliban takeover.

"Three of my colleagues went to meet in a park. The Taliban tracked them down and assassinated them on the spot," he says. "We were closer than brothers."

"Crossing the water by boat, I know there is a 99.99% chance of dying. But if I'd stayed in Afghanistan, I'd already be dead.

"The UK may send us to Rwanda, but I want a chance to put my case before them and tell them why I fled my country."
 

ghazi52

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So much blood, so little learned in US

Year after Afghan exit, policymakers yet to confront Afghan failures, experts say

After two decades of bloodshed in Afghanistan, the United States' haste to end the country's longest war came with little thought on both the plight of the Afghans and on what Washington policymakers got wrong, military experts say.

The withdrawal of US forces simply marked the end of a failed policy and, over the year that has passed since the chaotic scenes in Kabul, not much reflection has gone on in the US about Afghanistan, said Jack Midgley, the principal of global consultancy Midgley & Co.

"The withdrawal ended a failed policy, a failed war," Midgley, who is also an adjunct associate professor in the Security Studies Program at Georgetown University, said in an interview with China Daily.

In 2001, the US military entered Afghanistan in the name of anti-terrorism. On Aug 30, 2021, the Pentagon announced that it had completed the withdrawal of US troops from Afghanistan. During their ignominious departure, many of them, as well as Afghan soldiers and civilians, were killed in a series of bombings and other terrorist attacks. The Taliban had seized power in Kabul in mid-August, immediately before the US-led foreign forces withdrew.

"If the interest of the United States requires, it will add any group to its list of terrorists. And if its interest requires it to exclude a group from the list, it will also do that," Abuzar Khapalwak Zazai, a professor at Kabul University, told Xinhua News Agency. The US left the Afghan people in a difficult position, and one they are still trying to get out of, the academic said.

Midgley said that for the US, the troop withdrawal meant that it cut its losses-in money and the lives of personnel. The exit benefits the US "in the short run" and "in a very narrow way", while "the long-run effects will be very hard to see", he said.

"There are so many weapons and military equipment left in Afghanistan, so many people who may be driven to extremism by the pressures they've been put under," he said.

Midgley said that Afghanistan has been experiencing "a total disaster". According to a World Bank report, the country's GDP has shrunk 45 percent since the US exit.

The US and other Western nations hastily evacuated more than 120,000 people, both foreigners and Afghans, during the exit in August last year, The Associated Press reported.

"They've lost almost all of the basic services including healthcare, education, but also law enforcement, the prison system, the correction systems … The money's gone, and those services and the experts that deliver them are all gone-no basic services," Midgley said.

"They can't get hard currency because of anti-money-laundering rules. So, about 70 percent of the people in Afghanistan don't have enough money to pay for food. This policy has been a failure right from the start."

Several dozen prominent US and international economists urged the United States earlier this month to hand over to Afghanistan $7 billion in frozen central bank reserves.

Midgley said that the US government should have learned good lessons after the troop pullout.

"There are some tactical lessons about the withdrawal," he said. "Things could have been done much better in terms of planning the withdrawal. But that's a relatively minor point."

For Midgley, the hard questions have yet to be answered in the US.

"The real lessons that have to be learned are about why we were there for 20 years to begin with," he said. "Why was this policy never systematically reviewed? Why did policymakers tell themselves that things were succeeding in Afghanistan when clearly they were not? When was the Taliban making the advances and being successful?

"No one on the US side was prepared to step up and say this is a failure and we need to get out until the very last minute. And then the withdrawal was handled poorly."

'Lessons not studied'

He added: "So, I would not say that those lessons have been learned. I'm not sure that the lessons have even really been studied."

The top Republican on the US House of Representatives' Foreign Affairs Committee released a report on Aug 16 criticizing the administration of US President Joe Biden for the "chaotic Afghanistan withdrawal". The report claimed that about 100 US citizens were stranded in Afghanistan after the withdrawal and the administration failed to help the thousands of Afghans who aided the US during the 20 years of occupation.

However, Midgley describes this report as "a set of cheap political shots". He said it is time for policymakers to reflect on the extent to which the US leads with military policy and not with economic development or humanitarian assistance.

"May I say the China model of investment and economic development that we see in countries like Saudi Arabia has been extremely successful," Midgley said. "The main American relationship with many countries in the Middle East is the military.

"The example of Afghanistan tells us that when the Americans try to create a new government or a new system by focusing on military intervention, it doesn't work; it failed."

He said that the US has been spending too much on the military rather than on basic infrastructure, education, healthcare, and issues that matter to people in the US today.

Midgley sees worrying signs as the US shovels billions of dollars in military assistance for Ukraine during the conflict with Russia.
 

Mohammad_2

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I wanted to open a thread for this, but as new member, I am not allowed to do so. I have to post it here.

Note: In this report they said that she was a minor, but I think she is 24.




Ex Taliban spokesperson Saeed Khosty accused of raping, torturing minor girl​

Taliban accounts are victim shaming Ilaha, a medical student who accused a Haqqani Network member Qari Saeed Khosti of rape & forced marriag​

A minor girl in Afghanistan, Elaha Dilwaziri, a student of Kabul University, has claimed that Qari Saeed Khosty, the former spokesperson of Taliban's Interior Ministry forcibly married, tortured and raped her. Dilwaziri has made the claims in a leaked video that has gone viral on Twitter.


Qari Saeed Khosty, meanwhile, has rejected the claim of rape and cited her 'un-Islamic beliefs' as the reason behind divorcing her. While in the video the girl showed injury marks on her body, Khosty said that he 'didn't hit her'.

What happened: The story came to light on August 30, when a video of Elaha Dilwaziri crying was posted on the Twitter handle of the news agency Aamna News English. In the video, Dilwaziri was seen crying while narrating her ordeal. She accused Khosty of raping and torturing her..

Torture and sexual harassment of a young girl by former spokesman of Taliban's interior ministryIn a video leaked to Aamaj News a young girl claims that former spokesman of Taliban's interior ministry, Saeed Khosty, has tortured, sexually harassed and forced her to marry him.

After this video, another video of the girl went viral, where Khosty is seen barging into the girl's house with two of his aides.

A new video leaked to Aamaj News verifies the claim of the girl harassed by Taliban former interior ministry spokesmanThe video shows that Saeed Khosty and his gunmen go to the house of Elahe, a medico, and when she cannot bear them, they beat her with a shovel.

Khosty's claims: After the videos went viral, Qari Saeed Khosty issued a statement saying that he married the girl at 'her request' and that he had divorced her after finding that she had a 'problem of faith'. He even accused the girl of committing blasphemy by insulting the Quran.

Khosty wrote on Twitter, "6 months ago, I married a girl named Elaha at her request, after that I saw that she has a problem of faith. I tried to correct her beliefs through advice and discussion, but, it didn't work, until she clearly insulted the Holy Quran which is also proven. (sic)"


Khosty also said that he didn't hit the girl, and that he has 'legally separated from his wife by giving her divorce'.

After the videos surfaced on Twitter, several people have been slamming both Khosty and the Taliban. Taliban-affiliated accounts on Twitter, meanwhile, have been busy victim-shaming Dilwaziri.

Taliban accounts are victim shaming Ilaha, a medical student who accused a Haqqani Network member Qari Saeed Khosti of rape & forced marriage.Qari denies the allegations but will the “Amirul Momineen” take this as a test case & Sharia court give justice to Ilaha?

Context: Ever since the US forces withdrew from Afghanistan in August 2021, women have had a difficult time merely existing in the Taliban-ruled country. Many of the advances that the women of Afghanistan made in the 20 years of no-Taliban rule in between, have totally been wiped out once the Taliban got back in power. As such, the news of the former Interior Ministry Spokesperson of the Taliban having married a minor girl forcibly, torturing her, and raping her has shaken people, even as the Taliban themselves are yet to react to the allegations.


Read more: http://www.rawa.org/temp/runews/202...aping-torturing-minor-girl.html#ixzz7ddmayPzz
 

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