• Monday, August 10, 2020

a tribute to the women of pakistan........

Discussion in 'General Photos & Multimedia' started by khanz, Feb 16, 2009.

  1. khanz

    khanz SENIOR MEMBER

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    lol ofcourse she is but i wish u didn't ask that ;)
    not every pakistani is fair :)
     
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  2. DarkStar

    DarkStar FULL MEMBER

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    Oh my God...I never knew salima ikram was Pakistani. I've seen her on the BBC and National Geographic channel.

    She's a world authority.
     
  3. Omar1984

    Omar1984 ELITE MEMBER

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    Yes. She's 100% Pakistani.
     
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  4. Omar1984

    Omar1984 ELITE MEMBER

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    Tehmina Daultana is a member of National Assembly of Pakistan.
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2009
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  5. khanz

    khanz SENIOR MEMBER

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    shazia sikandar-artist
    Shahzia Sikander (b. 1969, Lahore, Pakistan) is a painter, living in New York City. She earned a BFA in 1992 at the National College of Arts in Lahore, Pakistan; and an MFA in 1995 at the Rhode Island School of Design in Providence, Rhode Island.

    She has had solo exhibitions at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden (1999/2000) and at the Renaissance Society at the University of Chicago (1998). Her work has been shown in group exhibitions at the Whitney Museum (1999/2000 and 1999), at the Third Asia-Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art, Brisbane, Australia (1999), and at the Ludwig Museum, Cologne, Germany (1999).

    Sikander has been schooled in the miniature painting tradition of Pakistan, and combines the historic iconography and technique with her own aesthetics resulting in a hybrid of traditional and contemporary styles. The imagery in her work references the tensions that exist in Islam, Hinduism and Christianity as well as her personal history, politics, and sexuality. Religion is a significant element in her art as well as her personal life, as she is a practicing Muslim. Sikander explores in particular, the role of Muslim women and challenges the view Westerners have of associating Islam only with terrorism and oppression of women.
    (love the last part of her bio couldn't be anymore fitting to the theme of this thread lol )


    Internationally acclaimed artist Shahzia Sikander will serve as the ninth guest curator of the “Selects” exhibition series in the Nancy and Edwin Marks Gallery, devoted to showing the museum’s permanent collection. Sikander will mine and interpret the museum’s collection and produce an installation of selected work. This exhibition will include a new work created by Sikander, inspired by Cooper-Hewitt’s collection. Trained as a miniaturist at the National College of Arts in Lahore, Pakistan, Sikander merges the traditional South Asian art of miniature painting with contemporary forms and styles. Her work explores the relationship between the present and the past and the richness of multicultural identities.


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  6. Omar1984

    Omar1984 ELITE MEMBER

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    ccacfcea4d633fb84683235dbd846cc1.jpg
    Razia Bhatti was a prominent jornalist of Pakistan.

    Razia Bhatti first entered professional Journalism in 1967 when she joined The Illustrated Weekly of Pakistan after completing her Master's degree in English and Journalism from University of Karachi. The lifestyles magazine she joined was later renamed Herald and turned into a monthly publication reporting on current events and political issues. In 1970, Razia Bhatti became the assistant editor of Herald and then became editor in 1976.

    When pressured to curb her writing and support the policies of Muhammad Zia-ul-Haq regime, Razia resigned from the Herald on an ethical stance. Most of her team of journalists resigned with her and together they established a new current affairs magazine called Newsline.

    Razia Bhatti has been described as a crusader, a torch-bearer, and a symbol of courage. In 1996, the Pakistan Press Foundation called her untimely death at the age of 52 an "end of a golden chapter of journalism in Pakistan." For those who attempted to silence Pakistani press, Razia Bhatti was undoubtedly a force to be reckoned with during her almost thirty-year long journalistic career. Despite constant harassments and threats to her safety, she wrote bravely on issues ranging from women’s rights to political corruption. She nurtured two of Pakistan’s leading English language publications, as editor of the Herald for 12 years and then of Newsline for another eight. In 1994, less than just two years before her death, Razia Bhatti was a recipient of the “Courage in Journalism” award from the New York based International Women's Media Foundation.
     
  7. Omar1984

    Omar1984 ELITE MEMBER

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    Independent filmmaker, Sabiha Sumar, has earned much acclaim for her films which deal with political and social issues such as the effects of religious fundamentalism on society and especially on women. Her first feature film, ‘Silent Waters (Khamosh Pani)’ has played in film festivals around the world. It is a story of a young man who has fallen under the influence of religious fundamentalists and his mother’s struggle to save him from it. Silent Waters won the Golden Leopard award at the Locarno International Film Festival in 2003. Sabiha’s first documentary, ‘Who Will Cast the First Stone,’ about three women in prison in Pakistan under Islamic law won the Golden Gate Award at the San Francisco Film Festival in 1998.
     
  8. Omar1984

    Omar1984 ELITE MEMBER

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    Iman Ali is a popular Pakistani model and actress. Fashion critics rate her among the top models of Pakistan. She has been described as bold and beautiful amongst the fashion circles. Iman Ali has a strong following among her fans especially among the youth of Pakistan. Iman Ali co-hosted the Lux Style Awards in 2005 and has starred in a string of successful television productions including Anarkali by Shoaib Mansoor. She is also the face of "Luscious Cosmetics" which is the record-breaking new brand of cosmetics for Pakistani women.




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  9. Omar1984

    Omar1984 ELITE MEMBER

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    Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy is a journalist and documentarian.

    Known for documentaries dealing with life in the Muslim world, Obaid became the first non-American to win the Livingston Award. Her films have aired on such networks as Channel 4, CNN, PBS, and Al-Jazeera.

    Obaid began her career with New York Times Television in 2002 where she produced Terror's Children, a film about Afghan refugee children, which won her the Overseas Press Club Award, the American Women and Radio and Television Award, and the South Asian Journalist Association Award. Since then, she has produced and reported on more than twelve films around the world.

    Born in Karachi, Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy was the first woman in her Pakistani family to receive a Western education. Obaid graduated from Smith College with a bachelor of arts in economics and government and then went to complete two master's degrees from Stanford University in International Policy Studies and Communication.



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  10. BelligerentPacifist

    BelligerentPacifist SENIOR MEMBER

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    I too have seen her in docus and never paid attention to the Pakistani-sounding name!
     
  11. Super Falcon

    Super Falcon ELITE MEMBER

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    i think you should open your eyes and see what is written in her shirt PCB
     
  12. khanz

    khanz SENIOR MEMBER

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    http://www.governorsindh.gov.pk/governors/img_governors/13.jpg

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    Begum Ra'ana Liaquat Ali Khan (Urdu: رعنا لیاقت علی خان) (née Sheila Irene Pant) (1905 - June 13, 1990) was born in a Kumauni brahmin family at Almora in the United Provinces of Agra and Oudh. However, her grandfather, a Hindu had converted to Christianity. She was educated at the University of Lucknow where she obtained a first class Masters degree with honors in economics in 1929.

    Contents [hide]
    1 Biography
    2 Initiatives for women
    2.1 Establishment of APWA
    3 Career
    4 Awards and honors

    Biography

    She began her career as a teacher in the Gokhale Memorial School after completing the Teachers Diploma Course from the Diocesan College, Calcutta. She was later appointed as Professor of Economics in the Indraprastha College, Delhi.

    In December 1932, she was married to Nawabzada Liaquat Ali Khan. After the reorganization of Muslim League, Begum Ra'ana devoted herself to the task of creating political consciousness amongst the Muslim women. Her struggle for emancipation continued till the creation of Pakistan for Muslims of India in 1947.

    After the assassination of her husband Liaquat Ali Khan in 1951, Begum Ra'ana continued her services for the social and economic benefit of women of Pakistan till her death in 1990.

    Career
    Begum Ra'ana served as Pakistan's ambassador to the Netherlands in the 1950s and as ambassador to Italy in the 1960s. She was the:

    First Muslim woman ambassador and Doyen of the Diplomatic Corps (while in the Netherlands),
    First Muslim woman Governor (of Sindh province in the mid–1970s),
    First Muslim woman Chancellor of a university (all the universities in Sindh)
    First Muslim woman delegate to the UN, and
    First Muslim woman to win the United Nations Human Rights Award,
    First Muslim woman to receive the Woman of Achievement Medal, (1950).

    Awards and honors
    Queen Juliana of the Netherlands conferred on her the Grand Cross of Orange–Nassau.
    Recipient of the International Gimbel Award for service to humanity . (1962)
    United Nations Prize in the Field of Human Rights for her outstanding contribution to the promotion and protection of the human rights embodied in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and in other United Nations human rights instruments. (1978)