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A successful adoption of zigzag technology in Punjab #SmogFreePunjab

truthfollower

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A great milestone has been achieved in only a period of six months to fight pollution. All brick kilns in Punjab province have been shifted on zig-zag technology.
A successful adoption of zigzag technology in Punjab - a move that will significantly help mitigate province's air pollution and smog.
#SmogFreePunjab


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Max

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We are neighbouring pollution which only nukes can remove.
 
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koolio

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Excellent initiative something Godfather league couldn't achieve. Great step in further reducing pollution.
 

truthfollower

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no matter what we do india will send us smog and we have to breath it
OMG :o: look at this you can see it from space.


Nov 20, 2017

Agricultural Fires in India and Pakistan

Agricultural fires in India and Pakistan

Agricultural fires in the northernmost section of the Punjab state of India form a large cluster in this satellite image taken by Suomi NPP. What is striking about this image is the massive number of fires that are clustered up against the border between India and Pakistan. There are also fires in Pakistan, but they are not as plentiful in number. Actively burning areas, detected by VIIRS are outlined in red. When they are accompanied by smoke which appears as a haze in this image, they are indicative of fire. This form of farming in the region known as "slash and burn" has been practiced for thousands of years. It enables farmers to clear old crop, return nutrients to the soil, and prepare the ground for a new growing season. These fire clusters look similar to the ones that were captured also by the Suomi NPP satellite on October 19 of this year.




November 15, 2020

- Fires Continue in India and Pakistan



Follow @NASA_MODIS

Fires Continue in India and Pakistan






Hazy skies covered much of northern India through October and mid-November 2020. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on board NASA’s Terra satellite acquired a true-color image that gave a snapshot of the continuing haze. The thickest smoke and haze blankets the foothills of the Himalaya Mountains, especially over the Punjab region of India. A river of haze spreads across the Indus River Valley to reach the Arabian Sea. A thinner haze hangs over most of the visible area of India.


Hazy skies are a common occurrence over several states in northern India in November. After crops are harvested, winds often spread a river of smoke across much of the Indo-Gangetic Plain.


Industrial pollution, vehicle emissions and dust contribute to the haze, most of it comes from crop-burning—especially in the states of Punjab and Haryana, where rice and wheat are widely grown. Burning typically peaks during the first week of November, a time when many farmers set fire to leftover rice stalks and straw after harvest, a practice known as stubble or paddy burning. The burning often coincides with falling temperatures and slow wind speeds, meteorological conditions that can lead to temperature inversions, which trap smoke in place.


A review of MODIS imagery from the region shows a few fires popping up in the fertile alluvial fields of Punjab, India on September 29 with only a slight haze over the region. By mid-October, fire activity in India had greatly intensified, with the addition of some fires in northeastern Pakistan. Haze had also greatly increased over the region as well as across India.



What is wrong with these farmers!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡







Thank you NASA
:usflag:
 

Imran Khan

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OMG :o: look at this you can see it from space.


Nov 20, 2017

Agricultural Fires in India and Pakistan

Agricultural fires in India and Pakistan

Agricultural fires in the northernmost section of the Punjab state of India form a large cluster in this satellite image taken by Suomi NPP. What is striking about this image is the massive number of fires that are clustered up against the border between India and Pakistan. There are also fires in Pakistan, but they are not as plentiful in number. Actively burning areas, detected by VIIRS are outlined in red. When they are accompanied by smoke which appears as a haze in this image, they are indicative of fire. This form of farming in the region known as "slash and burn" has been practiced for thousands of years. It enables farmers to clear old crop, return nutrients to the soil, and prepare the ground for a new growing season. These fire clusters look similar to the ones that were captured also by the Suomi NPP satellite on October 19 of this year.




November 15, 2020

- Fires Continue in India and Pakistan



Follow @NASA_MODIS

Fires Continue in India and Pakistan






Hazy skies covered much of northern India through October and mid-November 2020. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on board NASA’s Terra satellite acquired a true-color image that gave a snapshot of the continuing haze. The thickest smoke and haze blankets the foothills of the Himalaya Mountains, especially over the Punjab region of India. A river of haze spreads across the Indus River Valley to reach the Arabian Sea. A thinner haze hangs over most of the visible area of India.


Hazy skies are a common occurrence over several states in northern India in November. After crops are harvested, winds often spread a river of smoke across much of the Indo-Gangetic Plain.


Industrial pollution, vehicle emissions and dust contribute to the haze, most of it comes from crop-burning—especially in the states of Punjab and Haryana, where rice and wheat are widely grown. Burning typically peaks during the first week of November, a time when many farmers set fire to leftover rice stalks and straw after harvest, a practice known as stubble or paddy burning. The burning often coincides with falling temperatures and slow wind speeds, meteorological conditions that can lead to temperature inversions, which trap smoke in place.


A review of MODIS imagery from the region shows a few fires popping up in the fertile alluvial fields of Punjab, India on September 29 with only a slight haze over the region. By mid-October, fire activity in India had greatly intensified, with the addition of some fires in northeastern Pakistan. Haze had also greatly increased over the region as well as across India.



What is wrong with these farmers!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡😡







Thank you NASA
:usflag:
10 years jail will be good idea
 

Bagheera

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lets talk on it why india did not stop farmers to burn remains ? :( kya kasoor hai hamara or hamary bachoon ka akher ?
A win-win solution for both countries. Allow Western investments. Develop technologies to reduce pollution. @Max

- PRTP GWD
 

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