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A Russia-China military alliance would be a bulwark against America’s global imperialism. Is it time for Washington to panic?

Oldman1

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You "paid for it"? That's your defense? Which of the Native Americans did you pay? Are casino licenses are the going rate for genocide in your book?
Yes we paid for it. Otherwise we be at war with Russia on Alaska, Louisiana Purchase from the French, Mexico for Southwest, Spaniards for Florida, etc. Unless the Europeans didn't care if the natives lived on those.
 

Beidou2020

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The more aggressive America becomes towards Russia and China, the more an alliance of some sort becomes a reality. Both know they need each other to counter America and its vassal states. Putin made this quote at a very interesting time.

US-Russian relations are in tatters. US-China relations are heading the same way.
This alliance might be restricted to US involvement in a war with Russia/China. Without US involvement, Russia and China can handle their respective neighbourhood on their own.
 

EGalois

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It's RT daydreaming. China won't be so stupid to go in to a military alliance with Russia.
The more aggressive America becomes towards Russia and China, the more an alliance of some sort becomes a reality. Both know they need each other to counter America and its vassal states. Putin made this quote at a very interesting time.

US-Russian relations are in tatters. US-China relations are heading the same way.
This alliance might be restricted to US involvement in a war with Russia/China. Without US involvement, Russia and China can handle their respective neighbourhood on their own.
China will not enter into an alliance with Russia. Russia has a lot of troubles with some other countries which we want to be friendly with.
 

FairAndUnbiased

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It's RT daydreaming. China won't be so stupid to go in to a military alliance with Russia.

China will not enter into an alliance with Russia. Russia has a lot of troubles with some other countries which we want to be friendly with.
China does business with US and Japanese allies.

Why would other countries care if China was a Russian ally?
 

ZeEa5KPul

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It's RT daydreaming. China won't be so stupid to go in to a military alliance with Russia.

China will not enter into an alliance with Russia. Russia has a lot of troubles with some other countries which we want to be friendly with.
Being in a formal military alliance with Russia doesn't mean getting dragged into Russia's escapades. These types of treaties usually stipulate joint defense in case of an attack on a member's territory - otherwise NATO would have been dragged into Syria by Turkey. Nobody is stupid or crazy enough to attack Russian territory.
 

EGalois

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Being in a formal military alliance with Russia doesn't mean getting dragged into Russia's escapades. These types of treaties usually stipulate joint defense in case of an attack on a member's territory - otherwise NATO would have been dragged into Syria by Turkey. Nobody is stupid or crazy enough to attack Russian territory.
Technically yes. But doing so would be perceived by those countries as a closer alignment with Russia. China wants to have good relations with countries like Azerbaijian, Turkey, Ukraine etc. China stays neutral in the Crimea conflict. China also doesn't want to support Armenia in the current Azeribaijain-Armenia conflict.
There's very little benefit for China to be in a military alliance with Russia. Russia's conventional military is dwindling as its economy and its technological edge is disappearing. There's nothing that a military alliance with Russia can do but China can't on its own. Yes, China still needs Russian oil, but that does not require a military alliance.

Plus, Sino-Russian relations is nothing like Sino-Pakistan relations. The 'friendship' is largely only official in Russia. Russians are very nationalistic. They still orient to the West because they think themselves belong to the West. Many Russians (esp the younger post-soviet generation) are racist against Chinese.
 

Oldman1

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US defeated Mexico and conquered half their land. Where's the payment?
Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo: February 2, 1848
Following the defeat of the Mexican army and the fall of Mexico City, in September 1847, the Mexican government surrendered and peace negotiations began. The war officially ended with the February 2, 1848, signing in Mexico of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. The treaty added an additional 525,000 square miles to United States territory, including the land that makes up all or parts of present-day Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming. Mexico also gave up all claims to Texas and recognized the Rio Grande as America’s southern boundary. In return, the United States paid Mexico $15 million and agreed to settle all claims of U.S. citizens against Mexico.

You also want the payment info with the Russians, French, Spaniards as well?
Dumbfuck, those were Imperialist themselves. Changing of Imperialists doesn't mean rightful payment was paid to the original owners =.
Too bad if you disagree with it.
 

FairAndUnbiased

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Technically yes. But doing so would be perceived by those countries as a closer alignment with Russia. China wants to have good relations with countries like Azerbaijian, Turkey, Ukraine etc. China stays neutral in the Crimea conflict. China also doesn't want to support Armenia in the current Azeribaijain-Armenia conflict.
There's very little benefit for China to be in a military alliance with Russia. Russia's conventional military is dwindling as its economy and its technological edge is disappearing. There's nothing that a military alliance with Russia can do but China can't on its own. Yes, China still needs Russian oil, but that does not require a military alliance.

Plus, Sino-Russian relations is nothing like Sino-Pakistan relations. The 'friendship' is largely only official in Russia. Russians are very nationalistic. They still orient to the West because they think themselves belong to the West. Many Russians (esp the younger post-soviet generation) are racist against Chinese.
71% of Russian people are pro China.


What does Turkey or Azerbaijan have to offer that Russia cannot, are you kidding me?
 

nahtanbob

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A Russia-China military alliance would be a bulwark against America’s global imperialism. Is it time for Washington to panic?
23 Oct, 2020 19:12


Servicemen of the Chinese Armed Forces march along Red Square in Moscow during the military parade to commemorate the 75th anniversary of Victory in World War II. © Sputnik / Ramil Sitdikov


Vladimir Putin says it’s ‘quite possible to imagine’ a full-blown defense pact between Moscow and Beijing in the near future. Such a deal would transform the geopolitical balance – and be a big headache for the US and NATO.

Just over 70 years ago, Stalin and Mao haggled in Moscow to create the short-lived Sino-Soviet treaty. With China’s Communist Revolution still fresh, Beijing turned to the Soviet Union for economic and military support in securing its new state. Ideologically on the same page, the two powers had a common enemy: the United States and its allies.

By securing a friendship with China, Stalin ultimately hoped to tilt the balance of the Cold War away from Europe and into Asia, giving him a strategic advantage over NATO.

History may be about to repeat itself. Russian President Vladimir Putin yesterday commented that he could not rule out a potential military alliance between Moscow and Beijing. Although he observed such a bonding was not currently necessary, he noted, “theoretically, it’s quite possible to imagine it,” and that, “without any doubt, our cooperation with China is bolstering the defense capability of China’s army,” and “time will show how it will develop … we won’t exclude it.”


Undoubtedly, China’s strategic ties with Russia are getting stronger. Although they do not see eye to eye on absolutely everything, what’s bringing it to this? And what would the consequence of such an alliance be? Ultimately, the two countries are again finding themselves united by the premise of “The enemy of my enemy is my friend,” and facing up against the United States and its treaty allies. This has already resulted in extensive military and technological cooperation. The outcome, however, of a formal military pact would be troublesome for Washington, shifting the balance of power across the Eurasian landmass, as well as on the specific frontiers on which it has sought to target Russia and China.

The turning point for growing strategic affiliation between Beijing and Moscow commenced in 2014. Faced with the Ukrainian crisis and Western sanctions, Putin turned to China to diversify Russia’s economic strategy, signing several landmark gas pipeline agreements that saw the Russian Federation deepen its role in providing energy to China. In turn, this period also saw Russia become a pivotal component of Beijing’s Belt and Road initiative, allowing Chinese investment to connect Eurasia with ambitious infrastructure developments, including the construction of roads and railways through Russian territory that have allowed China to establish direct land routes to European nations.

But as this economic relationship has intensified, so has the military one. China, too, has found itself at the forefront of growing antagonism in recent years from the West, not least the United States. While Russia’s concern has been the frontier of Eastern Europe and the expansion of NATO eastwards, China, on the other hand, faces a growing military presence by the US and its allies around its maritime frontier in the South and East China Seas, with Washington touting its “free and open Indo-Pacific” initiative as a bid to contain Beijing. Both countries are secure within their continental landmasses, but face constant strategic headaches over these “hostile peripheries,” and herein is where common interests coverage into the military cooperation.

What impact would such an alliance have? A formal agreement would ultimately pose problems for America and its allies. First of all, in North East Asia around the Korean peninsula and Japan, a Russia-China partnership would change the balance of power comprehensively, especially in terms of air and naval power. The addition of Russia into the South China Sea disputes would also expand Beijing’s dominance across the region, particularly in the air, were China to offer access to bases in this region. Likewise, the addition of Chinese capabilities in Europe would also pose new challenges for NATO. The pairing would also turn the balance of nuclear forces in the world against the US, probably provoking an arms race.

Of course, this is all hypothetical. The countries have growing interests and they are first likely to intensify their strategic, economic, and technological cooperation – for example, Russia is providing a bastion for Huawei while the US attempts to force it out of Western markets – but, nonetheless, this is not quite enough to form a committed marriage. Moscow and Beijing have differences. An involvement of China on Europe’s NATO front would further sour its attempts to improve trade and investment relations with the European Union, while Russia likewise continues to have interests in dealing with India, which has been a forefront of Chinese military friction.

However, one may note that these differences aren’t bucking the trend. Cooperation between the two countries will continue to grow – at the very least, each one serves as a vital strategic counterweight to hedge against policies of containment, sanctions, and antagonism posed by the Western alliance. They clearly need each other, but whether this will at some point result in a formal military alliance is not yet certain. But it is a prospect that will surely worry Western policymakers.


TRANSLATION: China cannot fight USA one on one
 

HalfMoon

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Not sure about US, Japan & Australia but Indians are running around like headless chickens.

70% of Indian military equipment is Russian origin.

And Russia has picked China over India.

Indian military would be fully (almost) grounded in the next few weeks due to lack of spares from Russia.

This is the best time for China & Pakistan to do a joint attack on India.

Kashmir & Kargil goes to Pakistan.

Ladakh, Nepal, Sikkim, Bhutan & Arunachal goes to China.

:chilli:
 

EGalois

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71% of Russian people are pro China.


What does Turkey or Azerbaijan have to offer that Russia cannot, are you kidding me?
If China wants to break out of the US's containment policy, it must NOT adopt a strategy of making alliances, as such America can always make a stronger alliance than China can. Alliance with Russia? Ok, but then it will only push EU countries (especially those in Eastern Europe) further away from China. EU-Russia relations will not thaw anytime soon either.

Azerbaijian is linked to Turkey. Turkey has strong soft power in the Muslim world. Yes, Russia has gas, but that's not Russian monopoly. And plus, Russia has few choices other than China to sell its gas, if the EU sanctions Russia.

I don't know what to say about the 71% number. I'd say most young Russians are indifferent about China and their cultural/economic elites are quite negative about China.
 
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FairAndUnbiased

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If China wants to break out of the US's containment policy, it must NOT adopt a strategy of making alliances, as such America can always make a stronger alliance than China can. Alliance with Russia? Ok, but then it will only push EU countries (especially those in Eastern Europe) further away from China. EU-Russia relations will not thaw anytime soon either.

Azerbaijian is linked to Turkey. Turkey has strong soft power in the Muslim world. Yes, Russia has gas, but that's not Russian monopoly. And plus, Russia has few choices other than China to sell its gas, if the EU sanctions Russia.

I don't know what to say about the 71% number. I'd say most young Russians are indifference about China and their cultural/economic elites are quite negative about China.
Turkey is hated throughout the Muslim world actually. And so what if they like Turkey, and Turkey doesn't like Russia, and China is allied to Russia? Turkey gonna command them to hate Russia and somehow get them to hate China? Turkey can't even command them to hate Syria.

US is already making more alliances. There's nothing you can do to change their behavior. You can't appease someone who hates you. Let me ask you a question: if your family was being threatened by a thug who openly carries a gun in front of your house, leaves death threats, the police are doing nothing, will you say "I don't know if I should buy a gun or talk to my neighbors about it, what if he brings his entire gang?"

That's stupid and naive. Why are you still being the typical passive little Asian American doormat?
 

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