Palestinian struggle for freedom.

Discussion in 'Middle East & Africa' started by PAFAce, Feb 17, 2010.

Share This Page

  1. iPakMan
    Offline

    iPakMan FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2011
    Messages:
    823
    Ratings:
    +0 / 329 / -0
    As long as there are people like you, peace will truly never be achieved.
  2. peristalsiso
    Offline

    peristalsiso BANNED

    New Recruit

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2011
    Messages:
    79
    Ratings:
    +0 / 16 / -0
    Are you angry with me because I offered the Arabs a military strategy that might serve to make you more lenient at the negotiating table?

    If you'll browse back you can note how I also used the same arguments to try to get Arabs on the peaceful resistance train, and accept Israel's existence.

    Arabs have legitimate gripes about Israeli's.
    For every video where Arabs call for the desctruction of Israel, i can show you Israeli youths who bully and oppress their Palestinian neighbors with backing from the IDF.

    Just last year, wikileaks revealed that Abbas made very significant concessions for peace to happen between his people and the Israeli's.
    But the Israeli's turned him down.

    So don't blame me for your failing peace process.
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  3. peristalsiso
    Offline

    peristalsiso BANNED

    New Recruit

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2011
    Messages:
    79
    Ratings:
    +0 / 16 / -0
    Hmm, absorbing that info. Checking it too.

    You're making them out to be saints. They're not. They're racist to the core.

    But... I can agree that Isreali arrogance serves to civilize the Arabs and hold back the floodgates of Arab/Muslim conquests.
    For that, I actually support Israel. Most of the time.

    It's just that the Israeli-Palestinian conflict causes much problems for the west in other areas of the world.
    I'd rather see some kind of progress on the peace process, than continue to see Israeli's dominate their Palestinian neighbors.

    Hamas has no problem sacrificing everyone in a total war strategy. I doubt they'll change that any time soon.
    I'll just continue to show Palestinians/Arabs the futility of their military strategy.
    And Israelis the futility of their arrogance.
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  4. ARSENAL6
    Offline

    ARSENAL6 FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2007
    Messages:
    1,694
    Ratings:
    +0 / 620 / -0
    Country:
    Israel
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    iPakMan ( which we ALL know what this semi anagram turns out to be - you racist ) , out of curiosity why do you pretend to be Israeli when you so clearly despise everything Israeli? You`re fooling no one, I mean come on, there are alot of Isreali who want to make peace with Arabs muslim alike and understand the disgusting attitude that their country have on Arabs, people that you harbour against a peaceful loving community.

    Not all ISraeli jews have THAT notion against another human being and would rather live side by side with Peacful muslim Arabs (which is all) than make war that is funded by the Zionist lobby.

    I wonder if you are one of those jealous type of Indian that poses onself as an israeli because the hate is just too much
    Know one thing, Israelis don't type idiotic comment like you have , they are usually done by hot headed jealous indians who have nothing better in thier life and degrade their fellow country man when other indians on this forum are trying to be good on PDF.
    DO us all a favour just stop.
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  5. iPakMan
    Offline

    iPakMan FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2011
    Messages:
    823
    Ratings:
    +0 / 329 / -0
    First of all your comment alone about Indians makes me feel disgusted by you. You and yours are traitors and you will get what you deserve one way or another one day. I can only hope all you wish for the Jewish nation and India will happen to you. I am Israeli, I am a Jew, I am a Zionist, and you are an ungrateful traitor and if there is any justice in the world you will suffer for your disgusting inhumanity.
    I would rather live and die by the side of Hindus than ever live by your side you peace of scum.
  6. Solomon2
    Offline

    Solomon2 ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2008
    Messages:
    9,888
    Ratings:
    +3 / 5,234 / -0
    Country:
    United States
    Location:
    United States
    I don't think Arsenal6 is Jewish or Israeli. When I first noticed him at PDF he was wearing the English flag (Cross of St. George). Perhaps he just switched to the Israeli flag to annoy us Zionists.
  7. iPakMan
    Offline

    iPakMan FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2011
    Messages:
    823
    Ratings:
    +0 / 329 / -0
    This is beyond annoyance. I won`t stand for this delusional prick insulting Hindus pretending to be Israeli.
  8. Elmo
    Offline

    Elmo RETIRED

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2009
    Messages:
    3,273
    Ratings:
    +0 / 2,122 / -0
    closed for moderation
  9. unicorn
    Offline

    unicorn FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2010
    Messages:
    1,473
    Ratings:
    +0 / 965 / -0
  10. unicorn
    Offline

    unicorn FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2010
    Messages:
    1,473
    Ratings:
    +0 / 965 / -0
    Palestinian Sesame Street falls victim to US Congress

    [​IMG]
    Shara'a Simsim's Kareem held by actor Rajai Sandouka at the programme's offices in Ramallah. Photograph: Nasser Shiyoukhi/AP

    With its colourful band of Muppets preaching tolerance and neighbourly love, the Palestinian version of the children's television programme Sesame Street had become a beacon of hope for children in a region ravaged by decades of unrest.

    But the cast of peace-loving characters have now found themselves in the crossfire of a political dispute between Palestinian leaders and the US Congress, and episodes have been axed for 2012.

    Sesame Street – known as Shara'a Simsim in Arabic – is one of many US-funded Palestinian shows suffering after Congress froze the transfer of nearly £130m to the US Agency for International Development in October. The suspension aimed to punish the Palestinians for appealing to the United Nations for membership.

    The funding suspension has affected a broad range of services in Palestine relying on American aid, including hospitals, education, government ministries and communications.

    This week, the Ramallah offices of Shara'a Simsim, the writing workshop room was empty and the set was closed.

    "If we had funding, we would be writing scripts, we would be reviewing scripts, we would be hiring film-makers to produce the videos," said executive producer Daoud Kuttab.

    The Palestinian show has been put on hold as more than £490,000 has been invested in the Israeli version of the show. The new season has a particular emphasis on teaching children the value of fairness.

    Danny Labin, an executive at the Israeli TV channel that co-produces Israeli Sesame Street, called the funding halt to the Palestinian show "extremely unfortunate".

    "Young children, whether Israeli or Palestinian, who are in need of educational tools to foster diversity appreciation and to prepare for life in a pluralistic society, should not be penalised or held accountable to the politics and political leadership, over which they have no control," Labin said.

    Shara'a Simsim debuted in 1996 and has produced five seasons since, with long intermissions for fundraising. It has promoted a message of peace and tolerance that Israeli critics say is often missing from Palestinian airwaves. The main characters Haneen, a red-headed orange puppet, and the green rooster Kareem have became household names for Palestinian children.

    Shara'a Simsim is one of about two dozen international shows produced by the Sesame Workshop, the parent company of the American show. Others are aired in Israel, Egypt, Russia and South Africa. In each country, the New York-based Sesame Street staff consults with the local production teams to create a unique cast and content.

    From 2008-2011, USAid gave £1.6m to developing the programme in Palestine, covering nearly the entire budget, Kuttab said.

    USAid was scheduled to issue another £1.6m grant to Shara'a Simsim to last until 2014, but in early October the funding was cut.
    Palestinian Sesame Street falls victim to US Congress | World news | guardian.co.uk
  11. killerx
    Offline

    killerx FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2007
    Messages:
    1,382
    Ratings:
    +0 / 613 / -0
    it all end soon the israel will fall again:devil:
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  12. Syrian Lion
    Offline

    Syrian Lion SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2012
    Messages:
    7,973
    Ratings:
    +1 / 11,065 / -0
    Country:
    Syrian Arab Republic
    Location:
    Syrian Arab Republic
    The Arab League is busy taking orders from D.C and Tel Aviv to sanction Syria and send a complain to the UN. But the Arab League can't even say a word about Gaza in their fake "arab" meetings.

    Syria is the only country that hosts the resisteince and took more then million refugees from Iraq and Palstine.

    GOD BLESS SYRIA ALASAD
  13. Solomon2
    Offline

    Solomon2 ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2008
    Messages:
    9,888
    Ratings:
    +3 / 5,234 / -0
    Country:
    United States
    Location:
    United States
    With These Enemies, Israel Needs More Friends

    By Jeffrey Goldberg Feb 20, 2012 7:00 PM ET

    The governor of New Jersey, Chris Christie, said something that caught my attention the other night at an event sponsored by the American Israel Public Affairs Committee, the pro-Israel lobbying group.

    He paraphrased a quotation of Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s: “I ask you to judge me by the enemies I have made,” and then said: “In that same spirit, I would like to say to all of you tonight: I admire Israel for the enemies it has made.”

    It was an acute observation, and one made not quite often enough. It is sometimes difficult, given Israel’s missteps, to remember that it is a democracy whose enemies are among the world’s most dangerous people.

    For American Jews, particularly the many who think of themselves as centrist or as somewhat to the left of center, the subject of Israel today provokes a contradictory and anxiety- producing mass of feelings: pride, discomfort, bewilderment, vexation, frustration, love. The precise mix often depends on the day of the week and on the news of the day. It has become a bit exhausting, thinking about Israel. (You can only imagine, then, what it is like to actually live there.)

    Defining Characteristics

    Gone are the uncomplicated, Leon Uris-scripted days of one- eyed war heroes and Yoni Netanyahu’s martyrdom on the tarmac during the raid on Entebbe. Benjamin Netanyahu stirs up knottier and more ambivalent feelings than his late brother ever did. This prime minister, unlike several previous prime ministers, seems not quite so interested in trying to reach an amicable divorce with the Palestinians. So the continued occupation (and, more to the point, settlement) of the West Bank, which offends the sensibilities of many American Jews (and most other people), is becoming Israel’s defining characteristic.

    How sad it is that a flourishing democracy with a contentious press and an independent judiciary, a haven for inventors and scientists, the only Middle Eastern country where it’s safe to be gay (and Christian, for that matter) is coming to be known mainly for its retrograde occupation of the West Bank.

    It is distressing for so many reasons: moral, political, theological and reputational. And it obscures the underlying cause of the conflict: The inability of many Arab Muslims, and their supporters, to reconcile themselves to the unalterable truth that the Jews are from the place that, before it was called Palestine, was called Judea and Israel.

    It is also distressing because it muddies what should be clear: Israel’s sins are quite often exaggerated, while the sins of its enemies -- and here we return to Governor Christie’s point -- could not be more heinous.

    Let us consider Israel’s four principal adversaries of the moment: the Islamic Republic of Iran, Bashar al-Assad’s Syria, and the fundamentalist terrorist groups Hezbollah and Hamas. Few would argue that the Israeli government has not behaved in counterproductive and sometimes-brutal ways. But anyone who possesses the basic powers of reason and observation understands that Iran and Syria on their best days don’t match Israel on its worst.

    Iran is run by a regime whose first, defining act was of mass hostage-taking. It is a country that has used its children to clear minefields with their feet and that guns down others when they protest repression. It is a country that uses rape as a weapon against dissidents. It is a country that, according to the U.S. Treasury Department, funds al-Qaeda.

    Killing Innocents

    Hamas is an organization that boasts of killing innocent children and regularly kills Palestinians with whom it disagrees, sometimes by throwing them from buildings. Hezbollah, of course, is a proxy of Iran’s regime, its external terror apparatus. Hezbollah has killed Americans, and its members have been indicted in the assassination a Lebanese prime minister. It seeks to impose an Islamist regime on Lebanon, and it functions as an arms supplier to Assad, who is Saddam Hussein’s successor as the world’s leading butcher.

    I am not arguing that Israel should be held to the debauched standard of behavior set by Iran or Syria. (Israel should be held to the standards of a Western democracy, albeit one under threat of missile attack and other, similar unpleasantness.) I’m actually arguing something different: That Israel, like the Jewish people for whom it is a refuge, attracts the hatred of terrible people, people whose terribleness would still be profusely evident even if the Jews or Israel never entered the frame. (Hitler and Stalin -- and Saddam -- come to mind, of course, as well as the Crusaders, the inquisitors, the pogromists, and I could go on).

    The hatred of Jews and the Jewish national home by men whom history has adjudged to be comprehensively evil should suggest a couple of lessons. The possible theological and cosmological lessons I will leave for another day, but the political lessons are more obvious: Good people should take the hatred directed at Israel by evil people as a sign that, just maybe, Israel’s basic cause is just. Israel and its supporters should understand that the enmity reflects well on their cause, and they should do whatever they can to guarantee that their behavior could never possibly be seen as analogous to the behavior of their enemies.

    (Jeffrey Goldberg, a national correspondent for The Atlantic, is a Bloomberg View columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.)
  14. Solomon2
    Offline

    Solomon2 ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2008
    Messages:
    9,888
    Ratings:
    +3 / 5,234 / -0
    Country:
    United States
    Location:
    United States
    By Hani Hazaimeh

    AMMAN - More than 17 years after the signing of the Jordanian-Israeli peace treaty, Jordanian journalists still find it difficult to contact Israeli sources to balance their stories.

    Many of them still view Israel as an enemy occupying Arab lands and oppressing a brotherly Arab people, which, they say, should be enough to deprive it of the right to get an Arab platform.

    When Israel is involved, patriotism should take precedence over all other considerations, Jordan Press Association (JPA) President Tareq Momani emphasised.

    The 950-member JPA opposes contact between its members and Israelis, he noted, adding that the case is different with respect to the state-run media.

    “We are totally against any contact with Israelis. The issue here is not just about journalism. Israel for us is still an enemy occupying Arab land and oppressing Arab people. We will not accept giving their views platform,” Momani told The Jordan Times yesterday.

    Last Thursday, Al Ghad daily reported that a Jordanian woman was suing the Israeli embassy for holding her against her will for 24 hours. The article had only the statement by the woman, who was employed by the embassy, and that of her lawyers, but lacked any response from the Israeli side.

    The reporter, Mwaffaq Kamal, told The Jordan Times that his decision not to get a comment from the Israelis was in line with his institution’s editorial policy, but is also within his personal convictions.

    “I agree that professionalism requires balanced reporting, but for me this is a case that involves an enemy,” Kamal told The Jordan Times on Saturday, adding that he complied with the JPA regulations.

    “Professionalism requires giving space to all parties to give their side of the story, and it is the readers’ decision to make up their minds,” Arab Reporters for Investigative Journalism Executive Director Rana Sabbagh told The Jordan Times yesterday.

    She underlined the sensitivity of issues related to Israel, but stressed that in news coverage, professionalism should be above all considerations.

    “Jordan has signed a peace treaty with Israel. Therefore, there is so much integration and collaboration between the two sides. For example, when reporting about water issues, Israelis should be contacted for a comment,” she said, adding, however, that this is an individual decision and editors cannot force journalists to do something that contradicts their principles.

    The JPA Law does not contain penalties against journalists who contact Israelis in the course of their reporting, but the head of the association’s disciplinary committee, Fayez Mubaydeen, told The Jordan Times that there can be a price to pay, which goes as far as revoking or suspending membership in the association.

    “When such a case is reported to the association, the disciplinary committee looks into it and raises its recommendation to the JPA council to take action accordingly,” he said.

    Interestingly, journalists working for state-run media outlets are excluded from this procedure, said Momani.

    “Jordan has diplomatic ties with Israel and officials from both sides exchange visits and meetings. As public sector employees, journalists working in public media institutions have no option but to report such news,” he noted.

    Tareq Hmeidi, an Al Rai reporter, told The Jordan Times that earlier this year, he was invited to a science conference in Qatar but decided to forego it when he heard that Israelis were also taking part in the event.

    “Regardless of my personal views, I cannot go against public opinion. The conference was purely scientific and had nothing to do with politics, but I decided to boycott it, in compliance with the regulations of the JPA,” said Hmeidi, adding that he was criticised by the US-based Science magazine for not attending.


    So no one has any guarantee that Jordanian reporters seek the truth when reporting on the Israel-Arab dispute. Something to keep in mind in both their writing and debates.
  15. Russell
    Offline

    Russell MEMBER

    New Recruit

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2012
    Messages:
    6
    Ratings:
    +0 / 10 / -0
    When will this all end, if ever?