Pakistan's Edge in Biometric Information Technology Services

Discussion in 'Economy & Development' started by RiazHaq, May 26, 2011.

Share This Page

  1. RiazHaq
    Offline

    RiazHaq SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2009
    Messages:
    3,425
    Ratings:
    +12 / 2,464 / -3
    All the hype about Indian IT sector makes it hard to believe that it is Pakistan, not India, which has widely deployed biometric identification technology to issue multi-purpose national ID cards and e-passports to its citizens.

    In fact, Pakistan is among the first few countries of the world to issue biometric national ID cards to 83 million citizens. Pakistan has also issued over 7 million e-passports to its citizens since October, 2004. These Multi-Biometric Electronic Passports, containing an RFID chip, facial and fingerprint images of the passport holder, PKI and other security features are compliant with ICAO standards.

    Established in the year 2000, NADRA, the National Database and Registration Authority, is Pakistan's state-owned IT services company that specializes in implementing multi-biometric national identity cards and e-passports, as well as secure access verification and control systems in both public and private sectors. It is recognized among the top 50 IT firms in the world by the ID World Congress.

    NADRA's database is among the largest, if not the largest, fully integrated databases in the world that supports both an Automatic Finger Identification System (AFIS) & a Facial Recognition System:

    • National Data Warehouse
    • Storage Capacity of 60 Terabytes
    • Processing Speed of 18 Trillion Instructions/ Sec
    • Multilingual Support of English/ Urdu/ Sindhi
    • AFIS with a matching speed of 16 million/sec
    • World's largest Facial Library of 83 million images (ICAO)
    • Network Infrastructure
    • Highly redundant, scalable and mission critical
    • Connected with more than 8000 computers
    • Equipped Terrestrial, VSAT, and DVB RCS/2 network Links

    Beyond the national ID cards and passports, other current NADRA projects are motor vehicle registration (VINs or vehicle ID numbers), driver licenses, law enforcement, gun licensing, credit reporting, authentication of various transactions, statistical data, birth/ marriage/ death registration, GIS, e-Governance, disbursement of grants and planning at federal, provincial, district and local government levels using the national database.

    NADRA's domestic public sector clients include the Ministry of Interior, Directorate of Immigration and Passports, National Highway Authority, Earthquake Reconstruction and Rehab Authority, UNHCR-Pakistan and Benazir Income Support Program for the poor.

    NADRA issued Watan cash cards as part of a recent project to hand out Rs 28.8 billion among 1.527 million flood affected families in rural Pakistan last year. It is now working with the FBR, Pakistan's tax collectors, to catch millions of income tax evaders.

    NADRA's corporate clients are Mobilink, Ufone, Telenor, Barclays Bank, Royal Bank of Scotland, Standard Charter Bank, PTCL, IESCO, SNGPL and SSGPL.

    International clients of NADRA include governments of Bangladesh, Kenya, Nigeria and Sudan. NADRA Technologies has recently entered into a agreement with Global Defense, a Turkish company, to pursue biometric IT services opportunities in Turkey and other European and Middle Eastern nations.

    PTCL, another state-owned company, is rolling out fast broadband access at low cost, and building data centers in Pakistan to enable cloud comouting on a large scale. PTCL has recently started rolling out 50 Mbits/sec broadband service in several cities and towns, and built large data centers in Karachi and Lahore.

    IT sector is alive, and it is focusing on solving real problems in Pakistan. And the state-owned enterprises like PTCL and NADRA are building IT infrastructure and developing and deploying information and communication technology to lead the way for both public and private sector companies in the country.

    Haq's Musings: Pakistan Leads Asia in Biometric IT Services
    • Thanks Thanks x 5
  2. Bond
    Offline

    Bond FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    May 12, 2011
    Messages:
    772
    Ratings:
    +0 / 1,056 / -0
    Haq's musings... :P

    why compare each & everything with India?
    • Thanks Thanks x 2
  3. majesticpankaj
    Offline

    majesticpankaj BANNED

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2010
    Messages:
    2,888
    Ratings:
    +0 / 2,202 / -16
    good to know that..india should catch up fast.. we are lagging behind..
  4. justanobserver
    Offline

    justanobserver SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2010
    Messages:
    2,208
    Ratings:
    +0 / 1,714 / -0
    There was no need to compare with India.

    But just to let you know, the UID project is way WAY more advanced, ambitious and on a much larger scale than NADRA will ever take

    For starters, the NADRA project just takes one fingerprint and facial data

    UID takes fingerprints of all ten fingers AND a retinal scan :woot:

    Look, Pakistan in down in the dumps and you're putting up all kinds of good new to raise people's spirits :tup: But comparison with India will only invite ridicule
    • Thanks Thanks x 2
  5. Pioneerfirst
    Offline

    Pioneerfirst FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2011
    Messages:
    801
    Ratings:
    +0 / 431 / -0
    Another thing about this system that it was to be used at Afghan border to check the movement of people and identify any criminal but Afghan Govt did not agreed.So the system exists at border but not operational:hitwall:
  6. SMC
    Offline

    SMC PDF VETERAN

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2005
    Messages:
    6,731
    Ratings:
    +0 / 3,229 / -0
    Country:
    Pakistan
    Location:
    Canada
    We posting good news now means we're doing it to raise spirits. The news itself means absolutely nothing. If Pakistan's GDP grows at 6 or 7% in the coming years, it's because we want to raise the spirits of the people.

    :lol:

    Man where do you seriously come up with such posts?

    I can't imagine how some bharatis will feel down the road in 5-10 years when WoT is no more and Pakistan's economy picks up. They will probably be throwing hourly tantrums.
    • Thanks Thanks x 4
  7. Aether
    Offline

    Aether PDF THINK TANK: ANALYST

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2008
    Messages:
    17,822
    Ratings:
    +6 / 15,935 / -0
    Country:
    Pakistan
    Location:
    Pakistan
    well its nothing new but surely good to hear that

    thanks for sharing
  8. somebozo
    Offline

    somebozo ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2010
    Messages:
    12,148
    Ratings:
    +0 / 10,870 / -0
    NADRA also designed for Saudi Arabia and Qatar for the first ever in GCC biometric systems after French failed miserably in quality control thanks to Indian sub contractors. As well NADRA is also building the Nigerian biometric identification system. Rumors had it that Indians wanted to consult NADRA as well but the parliments has put off any such proposal due to security concerns.
    • Thanks Thanks x 2
  9. majesticpankaj
    Offline

    majesticpankaj BANNED

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2010
    Messages:
    2,888
    Ratings:
    +0 / 2,202 / -16
    provide the source please...
  10. justanobserver
    Offline

    justanobserver SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2010
    Messages:
    2,208
    Ratings:
    +0 / 1,714 / -0
    Pssst ! I have irrefutable proof
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  11. Mabs
    Offline

    Mabs FULL MEMBER

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2009
    Messages:
    707
    Ratings:
    +1 / 576 / -0
    ^^^ NADRA does not take just one fingerprint. Since you were so authoritative in your claim, I will leave it up to your genius mind to scratch up the real and accurate information.
  12. RiazHaq
    Offline

    RiazHaq SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2009
    Messages:
    3,425
    Ratings:
    +12 / 2,464 / -3
    Here is a DNA India story on India's UID project, aka Aadhaar:

    Is the government of India’s ambitious Unique Identification (UID) Card project as robust as it pledges to be? Can it ride over the omnipresent hurdles posed by the country’s massive population and technological shortfalls? Some of these questions have been put forth in a working paper of by Prof Rajnish Dass of the Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad (IIMA). The project aims to provide a unique 12-digit number to 1.2 billion residents of India.
    The paper titled ‘Unique Identity Card Project in India: A Divine Dream or a Miscalculated Heroism’ brings out the crucial point of need to consult stakeholder groups, to understand IT readiness and expectation gap for a project like this, and hold public debates since huge cost and effort are being put into the largest project in the world.

    “A concrete execution plan of the project can be designed by clearly mapping the efforts and resources of the project with the intended benefits and presented to the people of the nation. In light of the perceived cost, feasible benefits and perceived risks, this should further be publicly debated in order to understand the readiness of the nation in taking such an initiative,” states the paper.

    The paper suggests that in view of the huge implications in terms of cost and effort, it becomes mandatory to put forward a detailed cost-benefit report before the people. It is because the nation has to look into other priority areas prior to initiating and executing such a task.

    Involvement of people or feedback about the significance of it is important, because if citizens do not find value in such cards or the government processes are not scaled up to match the working of such identification, the mammoth efforts and money spent on the project would be seriously questioned, says
    the paper.

    The paper points out four challenges before the project. The UID project has gathered criticism which is stated in the paper under four heads. First, the project would necessarily entail violation of privacy and civil liberties of the people.

    Second, it remains unclear whether biometric technology- the cornerstone of the project-is capable of the gigantic task of de-duplication. The Unique Identification Authority of India's (UIDAI) "Biometrics Standards Committee" has noted that retaining biometric efficiency for a database of more than one billion persons "has not been adequately analysed" and the problem of fingerprint quality in India "has not been studied in depth".

    Third, no cost-benefit analysis or feasibility report for the project has been made till now. Finally, the purported benefits of the project in the social sector, such as in the Public Distribution System (PDS), are "largely illusive," says the paper.

    The paper also says that outrageous costs, technology gaps, privacy issues, political challenges, and lack of clear vision and mapping of the perceived benefits that can be accrued out of such an exercise are some factors that hinder viable and sustainable implementation of a national identity programme. Talking about the limitations and risks involved in the massive scale programme, the paper says that the complexities of a unique identity scheme become multifold for a nation like India, with over 1.2 billion population spread across 32,87,263 sq km, more than 35.16 per cent being illiterate (2001 census) and speaking 22 different languages, and following various religions.


    Is the unique identification card project really viable? - India - DNA
  13. justanobserver
    Offline

    justanobserver SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2010
    Messages:
    2,208
    Ratings:
    +0 / 1,714 / -0
  14. nick_indian
    Offline

    nick_indian SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2010
    Messages:
    7,449
    Ratings:
    +3 / 8,702 / -11
    UID is a reality and will be implemented at the national scale . There is no doubt about that .

    But i don't understand what is the obsession with India ?

    If you want anyone to say that Pak is ahead of India in IT then ok I am saying it . Does that change anything at all ?
  15. nick_indian
    Offline

    nick_indian SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2010
    Messages:
    7,449
    Ratings:
    +3 / 8,702 / -11
    When and if it happens then we will talk about that . No point speculating right now .You are assuming that TTP and all other terror organisations will vanish from Pakistan suddenly when US gets out of afghanistan . A logic which is very debatable .

    Lets just wait and watch .
    • Thanks Thanks x 1