Operation Rah-e-Nijat

Discussion in 'Pakistan's War Against TTP' started by Imran Khan, Jun 16, 2009.

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  1. Muhammad Yahya
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    Muhammad Yahya SENIOR MEMBER

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    Dear TK,

    Money or terror were minor factors , the major factors were political vacoum generated due to delay in their demand of Shariah law and poverty, they wanted jirga system based on shariah law, practically no one have trust on police and civil courts even in settled areas of NWFP police has no powers , same is case in southern punjab ,interior sindh and balouchistan.

    In Afghanistan also talaban got support of local people and then captured almost whole Afghanistan similar tactics they used in FATA and SWAT.

    You know maliks were enjoying all facilities from federal government and common pushtoons were in deep poverty, naturally no option left for them to support talaban or join them .


    I am afraid ,if GOP failed again to take right measures these tribes men will again start supporting talaban.
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  2. TaimiKhan
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    TaimiKhan SENIOR MODERATOR

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    Sir, these all problems were there for 55 years, no militancy was there then, why after 55 years militancy came that also after hostile nations came next to out border areas from where all these so called shariah implementers get their support, funds & weapons.

    If you think they are fighting for Shariah, sorry to be saying this but you are living in a fantasy land.

    Taliban are not fighting for Shariah and nor have they implemented Shariah ever, even in Afghanistan. Implementing 5 things of Shariah out of hundreds isn't called implementing it.

    Problem with Pushtun nation is that individuals in the past & present have used them for their own benefit just by using the word of Shariah & Jihad. And in the process the real meaning of Jihad & Shariah has been lost.
    And these so called upholders of Shariah are the same people who destroy the Shariah or Islam when it comes to their own traditions.
    Out of hundreds of examples, just let me tell one small one about these so called Shariah implementers, when someone kills an innocent human being, the killer goes to the tribal area and becomes the guest of these so called shariah upholders. And giving back their guest is a dishonor to the host. My uncle was killed by a guy in a masjid when he was praying, the murderer went to the tribal area and after 2 years of non-stop pursue by government & local elders, the killer was handed over. This is one example, hundreds of such cases happened and those murderers are still there and now joined with the taliban, thousands of people kidnapped for ransom & some later killed, where is & was Islam or Shariah in such matters, here Pukhtunwali comes first then Islam or Shariah.

    So kindly don't tell me who these people are & what they want, i live in their area, i grew up among them and i have a very good knowledge about what they want and for whom they are working.

    And these tribal elders who took govt money, they would use that money on their own people and they had quota for jobs too. The 35,000+ FC personnel & hundreds of Khasadar forces come all from there tribal areas. The strength in army is separate then this. They had no issues with jobs, the main issue was basic necessities of life, and also given a clear example that how they want them. If there are 300 villages, you can't make 300 hospitals or tube wells or schools. Some things are to be common, and these people don't want them to be common. So in such scenario what can you do ??

    And please don't speak about shariah, specially in context to these people as they have no idea what shariah is or what Islam is.
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  3. Muhammad Yahya
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    Muhammad Yahya SENIOR MEMBER

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    I know pushtoon tradition very well and lived in NWFP for two decades, one of my friend married a pushtoon girl of mahsood tribe with out the will of elders of girl.Mahsood jirga wanted to kill my friend but finally issue settled with concent of father of girl.

    They want immediate solution for them civil court procedure is not acceptable, this is main problem in NWFP and SWAT.

    I hope you understood my point.
  4. TaimiKhan
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    TaimiKhan SENIOR MODERATOR

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    Yes i did understand your point in the first place, but my emphasis was that this is not the main cause or issue. these are the minor ones.
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  5. fatman17
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    Pakistan needs ‘months’ for Waziristan push, says army

    Tuesday, 18 Aug, 2009
    View attachment 4543
    Lieutenant-General Nadeem Ahmed. — Photo by APP Pakistan

    ISLAMABAD: The Pakistani army needs months to prepare an offensive against the Taliban in their South Waziristan stronghold on the Afghan border, an army commander said on Tuesday.

    ‘It's going to take months,’ Lieutenant-General Nadeem Ahmed told reporters after briefing visiting US envoy to Afghanistan and Pakistan Richard Holbrooke.

    Ahmed said the army was short of ‘the right kind of equipment’ and helicopters were being used in an offensive against militants in the Swat valley, northwest of Islamabad. Those helicopters needed maintenance, he added.
  6. Muhammad Yahya
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    Muhammad Yahya SENIOR MEMBER

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    Agreed with Gen Nadeem.

    30 days Kargil war cost us approx 1 Bill USD , similarly SWAT operation costing us 3 to 4 mill USD SWAT per day, if we start FATA operation cost will be 10 Million per day.

    Our yearly national budget is 4 to 5 Bill USD , so our war for terrorism is totally dependent on US allies aid and grants.

    If want to completely flush these terrorist it may cost us 50 Billion USD in five years.
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2009
  7. PakShaheen79
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    Good News is Molvi Umer has been arrested by security forces from Mohmand agency yesterday. This is a big catch and will help security forces to get valueable info from him.
  8. fatman17
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    the defence budget has been increased by Rs, 30 bill (~US 400 mill) in local funds for fiscal 09-10. the CISF fund from the US will come on-line in October and that will bring in US 700 mill over the next 2 years.
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  9. fatman17
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    Officials: US missile strike kills 9 in Pakistan

    By MUNIR AHMAD, Associated Press Writer Munir Ahmad, Associated Press Writer
    View attachment 4573
    ISLAMABAD – A U.S. drone fired a missile into a suspected militant hide-out in Pakistan's lawless northwest, killing nine people in the stronghold of a jihadist commander accused of attacks on Western troops in Afghanistan, intelligence officials said.

    The United States is suspected of having launched more than 40 missile strikes from unmanned planes on al-Qaida and Taliban targets close to the Afghan border since last year, reportedly killing several top commanders, but also civilians. Earlier this month, one such strike is believed to have killed the Pakistani Taliban chief, Baitullah Mehsud.

    Friday's attack was on a housing compound in Dande Darpa Khel, a village less than a mile (about one kilometer) west of Miran Shah in North Waziristan, three intelligence officers said condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to the media. They said several people were wounded.

    Authorities stepped up security in the region following the attack, and the officials said they were working to get details about the victims.

    Dande Darpa Khel and surrounding areas are strongholds of Afghan Taliban leader Siraj Haqqani, whose network is powerful in eastern Afghanistan. He has a large Islamic school in the village that was hit by a suspected U.S. missile in October 2008, killing about 20 people.

    Siraj is the son of senior Taliban leader Jalaluddin Haqqani, a veteran of the fight against Soviet troops in Afghanistan in the 1980s, who American commanders now count as a dangerous foe. Haqqani is alleged to have close connections to al-Qaida and to have helped funnel foreign fighters into Afghanistan.

    The Haqqanis have been linked to attacks in Afghanistan, including an attempt to kill President Hamid Karzai and a suicide attack on a hotel in Kabul, both last year. Haqqani network operatives also plague U.S. forces in Afghanistan's eastern Khost province with ambushes and roadside bombs.

    Pakistan's border region is remote, mountainous and there is little government or military control there. Al-Qaida's top leaders, including Osama bin Laden, are believed to be hiding in the area and militants move freely across the border.

    The U.S. occasionally fired missiles into the region beginning in 2006, but dramatically stepped up the attacks last year.

    The strikes have targeted militants behind surging attacks in Pakistan, those blamed for violence in Afghanistan, and al-Qaida and other foreign terrorists allegedly using the area to plot or train for terrorist attacks around the world.

    The missiles are fired from CIA-operated drones believed to be launched from across the border in Afghanistan or from secret bases inside Pakistan. They are reported to be piloted by operatives inside the United States. U.S. officials rarely — if ever — acknowledge the airstrikes.

    The Pakistani government publicly protests the attacks, which are unpopular among many in the Muslim country of 170 million people, many of whom see the United States and its allies as conducting an unjust war against fellow Muslims in Afghanistan.

    Despite this, it is assumed to be cooperating with the strikes and providing intelligence for them.

    The government says Washington should give the technology to Islamabad because its military is capable of using the drones.


    Associated Press writer Hussain Afzal in Parachinar contributed to this report.
  10. Muhammad Yahya
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    39 killed in drone strike, operation

    MIRANSHAH/PESHAWAR: More than 30 Taliban were killed in the NWFP and the Tribal Areas on Friday, including eight when a pilot-less drone targeted a North Waziristan house as security forces continued efforts to flush out the Taliban from the region.

    Security forces carried out an operation against militants in Michni area of Mohmand Agency killing 12 militants, AFP reported. Also, 12 men were killed and three security personnel injured in a clash between security forces and militants on Friday, the Online news agency reported.

    Separately, a US drone fired missiles at a house in North Waziristan killing 15 people, including eight militants. Fifteen minutes after the drone attack, the Taliban attacked the Ameen security checkpost near Miranshah, injuring two security forces personnel. Returning fire, security forces killed five Taliban.

    haji mujtaba/agencies
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    COMMENT: Beyond Baitullah —Shaukat Qadir

    The support that Al Qaeda provided to Baitullah Mehsud’s TTP is likely to dry up. Which implies that when and if high value targets are subjected to attacks, they are likely to be less damaging and may even be less frequently successful

    On August 5, an American drone targeted the house of Maulana Ikramuddin, Baitullah Mehsud’s father-in-law, killing Baitullah, his second wife and three others. It took two days after the attack for his death to be announced. If he was a CIA agent, as many among the Mehsuds believe, he had finally outlived his utility.

    Let us first examine how Baitullah was different from the other Taliban. I have, in the past, attempted to explain that the tribes bordering Afghanistan — Mehsuds, Wazirs, and Mohmands — revolted against their traditional tribal leadership and the Pakistan government after the US invaded Afghanistan, since both the tribal leadership and the Pakistan government did not want these tribes to get involved in the Afghan struggle against US occupation. Thus this revolt at two levels threw up a new leadership in these tribes. Baitullah was a product of this revolt.

    In 2007, Baitullah formed the Tehreek-e Taliban Pakistan and attempted to unite all Taliban groups under his leadership. However, neither the Wazirs nor the Mohmands nor even Fazlullah in Swat accepted him as their leader. He did, however, at that stage, enjoy considerable support within his tribe.

    This was the period when Pervez Musharraf was still domestically selling the line that ‘we have been forced into fighting America’s war’; while taking the occasional step against terrorism to pacify the gullible Bush administration. This was also the period when the Lal Masjid episode, the judicial crisis, and the declaration of emergency had diminished Musharraf’s authority, spreading uncertainty in the rank and file of the army, causing large number of forces to surrender to a handful of Taliban; thus strengthening Baitullah et al.

    This year also witnessed Al Qaeda’s announcement that Pakistan had replaced the US as its enemy number one. Meanwhile, the Wazirs, under Maulvi Nazir, were fighting pitched battles to oust foreigners from their area; mostly Tajiks and Uzbeks, with a smattering of others. At this stage, Baitullah decided to take up Al Qaeda’s call and, instead of fighting against the US occupation of Afghanistan, took on the Pakistani state.

    He began by welcoming all foreigners to his area. He also received assistance from Al Qaeda to set up training schools, run by his aides Hakeemullah and Qari Hussain, for potential suicide bombers. Al Qaeda also provided ‘advisers’ who helped plan attacks in meticulous detail.

    While the influx of foreigners and his decision to target Pakistan steadily diminished the support from his own tribe, Baitullah seemed to be rolling in dollars, was reputedly in possession of the best communication and communications monitoring equipment available, as well as the most sophisticated weaponry. In addition, while he took foreigners under his wing, they undertook his protection. What is more, he replenished his stock of suicide bombers with volunteers from Southern Punjab. At the last estimate, there were over two thousand of these; trained or under training.

    A less publicised fact is that on the day of his death, a delegation from the Mehsud tribe came to Islamabad to meet with government officials, seeking internally displaced persons status for thousands of families from the Mehsud tribe, people who opposed Baitullah’s attacks on Pakistan and who wanted to escape before military operations began in their area, just as residents of Swat did. I gather that these included a number of erstwhile supporters of Baitullah who were willing to provide information in return for amnesty.

    Official reports say that during a dispute that erupted at a meeting to decide Baitullah’s succession, one of his aides, Hakeemullah, was killed. This was but natural, and is probably true. On August 16, a group of Wazirs was attacked and seventeen of them killed; ironically, they were returning from a raid on pro-US forces in Afghanistan. Turkistan Bittani, one of Baitullah’s rivals still surviving, has accused Baitullah’s group and reported Maulvi Nazir, leader of the Wazir TTP. While the Wazirs are not certain who attacked them, most of them are convinced that they were ambushed by Uzbeks and Tajiks, who had been under Baitullah’s protection and were returning to Afghanistan after his death. They believe this was their parting revenge for the Uzbeks killed by the Wazirs since 2007.

    Although it is rumoured that Maulvi Nazir is among the dead, I tend to believe the (other) rumour that he is seriously injured and might not survive.

    In any case, Baitullah is no more. His tribe no longer finds foreigners acceptable, nor are they willing to accept the supremacy of any of his aides; Hakeemullah, Waliullah, or Qari Hussain. None of them can bring in Baitullah’s wealth, weapons, or support from Al Qaeda.

    So, what implications does this have for our future?

    Like I stated in an earlier article, if there are only five thousand trained and committed suicide bombers left and they carry out only one attack daily, it will take almost fifteen years for them to end. Consequently, suicide attacks are something we are destined to live with, for quite some time to come.

    However, the support that Al Qaeda provided to Baitullah’s TTP is likely to dry up. Which implies that when and if high value targets are subjected to attacks, they are likely to be less damaging and may even be less frequently successful. It also implies that the mechanism that was churning out these killing machines is likely to slow down in the immediate future and dry up soon thereafter.

    It also means that while the freedom struggle against US occupation is unlikely to diminish in intensity, military operations in Waziristan may not even be necessary. If it is still necessary, it is likely to be a far easier operation than it would have been were Baitullah alive and supported by his foreign troops.

    Has the tide turned? The anti-Taliban feeling in mainland Pakistan seems to have become more unanimous than the anti-American feeling. Rebel tribesmen are feeling the heat and, it is very possible that soon, bodies of ex-Taliban might start turning up in Waziristan like they are doing in Swat.

    I am no supporter of vigilantes, but it seems that they might well replace the Taliban, unless the government acts, and acts very soon, to fill the administrative vacuum of law enforcement. Otherwise, we may next have to battle the vigilantes if we defeat the Taliban.

    This article is a modified version of one originally written for the daily ‘National’. The writer is a former vice president and founder of the Islamabad Policy Research Insititute (IPRI)
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  13. TaimiKhan
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    Hakeemullah annnounced new leader – doubts linger

    DAWN.COM | Pakistan | Doubts remain as Hakeemullah annnounced new leader

    ISLAMABAD: The Pakistani Taliban announced a successor to slain commander Baitullah Mehsud, but intelligence officials said on Sunday it was probably a smokescreen meant to hold together a movement left leaderless for almost three weeks.

    Taliban officials rang journalists in northwest Pakistan on Saturday to say Hakeemullah Mehsud, a young militant who commands fighters in the Orakzai, Khyber and Kurram tribal regions, had been chosen as the new chief by a leadership council, or shura.

    Western governments with troops in Afghanistan are watching to see if any new Pakistani Taliban leader would shift focus from fighting the Pakistani government and put the movement's weight behind the Afghan insurgency led by Mullah Mohammad Omar.

    A BBC report quoted Faqir Mohammad, head of the Taliban in the Bajaur tribal region, as saying Hakeemullah was selected.

    Tribal elders told Reuters that Hakeemullah was named after Faqir Mohammad was dissuaded from taking the leadership, although earlier he had said he was taking temporary command.

    'There's confusion. Two days ago, Fariq Mohammad claimed he's acting chief and now he says Hakeemullah is,' one senior intelligence officer in northwest Pakistan said. 'It's a trick.'

    Intelligence officials insisted Hakeemullah was killed or gravely wounded in a shootout with a rival days after Baitullah Mehsud was killed by a US missile strike on Aug. 5.

    'The announcement is real, but the man isn't,' the officer said. 'The real Hakeemullah is dead.'

    Another senior officer, who requested anonymity, speculated that the Taliban leadership was trying to buy time until one of Hakeemullah's brothers returned from fighting in the Afghan insurgency to take command of his men.

    Verifying anything in the Taliban-held tribal regions is difficult and the past few weeks have seen a spate of claims and counter-claims by the Pakistani authorities and the militants.

    Taliban officials say Pakistani intelligence agents were spreading misinformation to create divisions in the movement.

    The Pakistani authorities say the Pakistani Taliban is in disarray and the statements made are meant to preserve some sense of unity until a new leader emerges.

    The Taliban have denied that Mehsud was killed in the missile strike, but say he is seriously ill.

    After the reports of a shootout between Hakeemullah and a rival a Reuters journalist subsequently received calls from both of them denying that there had been any fight.

    Intelligence officials doubt whether the callers were who they said they were, even though the journalist knew both men's voices and believed they were genuine.

    Baitullah had united 13 militant factions in northwest Pakistan to form the Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan in late 2007, and the Pakistani authorities are hoping that death would hasten the disintegration of the loose-knit alliance.

    A virtual silence over the succession issue in South Waziristan, the stronghold of Baitullah and region where the largest number of fighters are concentrated, made intelligence officials doubt if consensus on a new leader had been reached.

    South Waziristan lies at the southwest end of the tribal lands bordering Afghanistan, and Bajaur is at the northeast end.

    Tribal elders said Faqir Mohammad was told to drop ideas of leading the Taliban as it would only bring more trouble to Bajaur, a region where the army declared victory in March after a six-month campaign against the militants.

    Security forces have surrounded Baitullah's redoubt in the mountains and carried out bombing raids, though a ground offensive does not appear imminent.
  14. TaimiKhan
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    The Expected Taliban Statement about Death of Baitullah :)

    DERA ISMAIL KHAN: Two commanders of the Pakistani Taliban say the militants' top leader, Baitullah Mehsud, is dead. They say he died from wounds from a US missile strike.

    The statements by two of Mehsud's top deputies are the first time the militants have acknowledged his death, first reported shortly after the Aug. 5 missile strike near the Afghan border.

    Hakimullah Mehsud and Waliur Rehman called The Associated Press on Tuesday evening to make the announcement. They said Baitullah Mehsud was wounded in the missile attack but only died Sunday.-AP
  15. Javed3
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    Fundamentalist:

    ""If want to completely flush these terrorist it may cost us 50 Billion USD in five years.""

    Yes, Your numbers are fairly convincing. Our burn rate on the War on Terror is almost US$ 5 b / year. We have spent about US$ 40 b since 2001; and got back approx US$ 12 b from the USA.

    We are the most Loyal nation for the USA. But we are paid very little for our enormous sacrifices because:
    1. It is much cheaper for the US to

    We get paid so little for our sacrifices. This is because:

    1. It is cheaper for the US to pay a few individuals handsomely, rather than invest in the welfare of 170 Million people.
    2. The real power rests with our Generals. They are generally contended with a bit of praise by white guys; and a bit of acknowledgment of the supreme sacrifices the Army has made in Swat and fata.
    3. Zardari and his government are perpetually indebted to the USA; their lives depend on American goodwill.
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