Indonesia Military News & Discussion Thread

Discussion in 'China & Far East' started by nufix, Jan 14, 2013.

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  1. Reashot Xigwin
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    Black Hawk Purchase as an Alternative to the Apache
    February 12, 2013

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    Blackhawk Helicopter armed version (photo: Airforce Technology)

    TEMPO.CO, Jakarta - plan purchases for the Black Hawk helicopters from the United States as an alternative if the price negotiations for the Apache helicopters reaches an impasse. If budgets are adequate, the assault helicopters purchase plan are targeted for completion in 2014.

    "(The purchase of Black Hawk) are still being planned by the army, a spokesman for the Ministry of Defence, Brigadier General Bambang Hartawan, told Tempo, Tuesday, February 12, 2013. He said the price of Apache helicopters was indeed very expensive. "So far is still in the negotiation stage," he said.

    The purchase of eight units of AH 64D Apache Longbow helicopters had previously been approved by the U.S. Congress. However, the purchase of Apache and Black Hawk are still being constrained by budget. "If the budget are enough the purchase can be realized ," said Bambang.

    The price of the Apache helicopters per unit alone is estimated at U.S. $ 40 million or around Rp 385 billion. Ministry of Defence and the Army had already signed a procurement contract for assault and attack helicopter with PT Dirgantara Indonesia. The contracts each worth U.S. $ 90 million and U.S. $ 170 million.

    Earlier, Chief of Army Staff General Pramono Edhie Wibowo expressed interest in buying 20 Black Hawk helicopters. "If permitted, and there are funds, we will order 20 units from the United States," he said, in Banda Aceh, yesterday.

    (Tempo)
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    Indonesia, Spain sign MoU on military cooperation
    Xinhua | 2013-2-13 16:19:58
    By Agencies

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    Indonesian and Spanish defense ministers signed here on Wednesday a memorandum of understanding ( MoU) to expand military cooperation between the two countries that has been discussed since 2007.

    The military cooperation will involve mitigation of the impact of natural disasters, according to the MoU.

    "They demonstrated their sincere readiness in 2004 when they directly came here from faraway place to help us in tackling the impact of the devastating tsunami in Aceh," Indonesian Defense Minister Purnomo Yusgiantoro said after signing the MoU with his Spanish counterpart Pedro Morenes Eulate.

    Besides disaster mitigation, the military of the two countries also expand cooperation in the aviation sector, particularly on the production of Casa planes for military purposes. PT Dirgantara Indonesia, a major aerospace company of the country, is licensed to produce propeller planes originally designed by Spanish plane maker Casa.

    "This would be cooperation in the science and technology sector, highlighted on acquisition and application of military equipment system," Purnomo said, quoted by local news portal detik.com.

    Through the close military cooperation, Indonesia wanted to enhance friendship and improve its defense technology.


    "This is a very important cooperation. We can learn knowledge on non-combat military operation from each other," Purnomo said.

    Indonesia, Spain sign MoU on military cooperation - Globaltimes.cn

    Indonesia-Spain to boost defense cooperation
    Wednesday, 13 February 2013, 19:03 WIB

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    Indonesian Minister of Defense Purnomo Yusgiantoro (left) meets with visiting Spanish Minister Pedro Morenes Eulate on Wednesday in Jakarta, Wednesday. Both agree to boost defense cooperation.


    REPUBLIKA.CO.ID, JAKARTA - Indonesian Minister of Defense Purnomo Yusgiantoro met with his Spanish counterpart Minister Pedro Morenes Eulate on Wednesday to increase cooperation on defense sector. They discussed on the enhancement of education, planning, innovation, logistic support and the acquisition of defense products.

    "MoU covers the attention of both countries to facilitate the increasing of cooperation which has been built since 2007," Minister Yusgiantoro said on Wednesday, adding that both countries were ready to facilitate the relations with Asia Pacific region.

    He said that Indonesia and Spain had good relations on aircraft marked with the production of civil and military Cassa aircrafts. He hopes they can expand their cooperation on shipbuilding industry.

    "We would like to intensify the cooperation between Spanish shipbuilding industry -Navantia- and Indonesian shipbuilding company," he said.

    http://www.republika.co.id/berita/en/national-politics/13/02/13/mi5qu6-indonesiaspain-to-boost-defense-cooperation
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  3. Reashot Xigwin
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    pardon me if there's a mistranslation...

    TD-2000B Composite Air Defense System Undergo Testing
    February 13, 2013

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    TD-2000B Air Defense System(all photos: PussenArhanud, Kaskus Military)

    TD-2000B missile integrated test

    TD-2000B integrated missile test held on Tuesday, January 29th, 2013 and Monday, February 4th, 2013 in Central Production and Testing Rocket (BPPR) and LAPAN Air Force Base, District Cikelet, Garut regency, West Java.

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    57 mm ammunition firing result, first proximity (left picture) and second (right)

    TD-2000B integrated missile system testing is divided into two parts, namely the test firing of 57 mm AA (Anti-Aircraft) dated January 29, 2013 and the test firing of missiles on February 4, 2013.

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    The first missile missed (picture left), immediately before the impact on the second missile (right picture)

    During firing test the 57 mm AA guns fired 57 mm HE (High Explosive) ammunition at balloon targets and fired 57 mm ammunition to a hexagonal object target tied into the airship, while missiles test uses Chinese made S-70 Target Drone.

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    Measuring the success of the test by firing 57 mm AA guns using HE ammunition is the accuracy by counting the number of projectiles shot into the circle of 15 miles on screen of the FCDV-1, when more than 30% of the projectile entered the circle the test is deemed satisfactory.

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    For testing the 57 mm proximity fuse on the projectile must be working properly and explode near the target. As for the the Drone test the missile must hit the target directly (direct hit).

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    The results of the test firing of 57 mm HE ammunition, the entire 27 round of projectile's enter the 15-mile loop that looks at the monitor FCDV-1. For firing ammunition proximity, the first shooting the projectiles exploded at a distance of 20 to 30 m before the target, the second firing the projectiles exploded at a distance of 2 to 5 m from the target. As for the firing the missiles it manage to get a direct hit on the second shooting.

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    In this firing test we found two new things, the first performance of proximity technology on 57 mm ammunition can improve kill probability of the 57 mm cannon and the second is the difficulty of the shot by using electro-optic missile target when flying below the cloud-covered sky as the reflection of the sun's heat on the edge of the cloud can divert the electro optics lock.

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    With the completion of the Integrated TD-2000B missile test the next activity to be carried out was the replacement of the whole gearbox vehicles that use the material contract with syncromesh system, vehicle testing, delivery of the weapon system to Lhokseumawe and ends with training of operators and technicians.

    (PussenArhanud)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/QW-1_Vanguard
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  4. nufix
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    KFX / IFX block 3 - VLO stealth fighter
    Design Updated

    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 5, 2013
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  5. nufix
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    Analyst: Indonesia's Spending on Power Projection; Minimum Essential Force phase II 2015 - 2019



    Military weapons modernization program to establish modern military posture in progress towards completion of the first half. Defense Minister Purnomo Yusgiantoro recently said that until the end of 2014 a program known as MEF (Minimum Essential Force) will reach 38% of the target value MEF. That means the second round later that lasted for the next 5 years will be pursued to 62% of the target completion of the MEF.

    Andi Widjajanto, University of Indonesia defense observer predicts that the military budget for the first two years of 2015-2019 MEF will reach U.S. $ 20 billion. If we compare with the budget MEF Phase I in 2010-2014 to reach U.S. $ 15 billion with the achievement of 38%, the figure of 20 billion U.S. dollars was comparable with the remaining 62% of the target to be achieved. The critical point of the way to achieving the target of 100% in the "second half" later for policy makers the postscript of the new government after 2014. If the new government later "in the same breath" with the difference that now even figure or had the same idea to solve military targets, the MEF will suit all of our expectations.


    Annual Military Budget Projection of Indonesia (% to GDP)

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    With Current GDP (USD 1.201 Trillion) 2015: USD 15 billion, 2020: USD 27 billion, 2025: USD 46 billion, 2029: USD 64 billion


    With Projected Future GDP, the number of annual budget will be even higher.
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    nice bird isn't it? :)
  8. nufix
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    indeed that is :)
  9. Reashot Xigwin
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    Army to increase firepower in Bukit Barisan
    The Jakarta Post, Medan, North Sumatra | Archipelago | Fri, February 15 2013, 7:05 AM

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    The Indonesia Army (TNI) will increase the combat capability of the Bukit Barisan Military Command (Kodam) to help safeguard the Malacca Strait and other border areas by deploying helicopters.

    The plan was revealed by Army chief of staff Gen. Pramono Edhie Wibowo on Wednesday, saying that the patrol group, which consists of six Bell 412 helicopters, would be significant for Bukit Barisan Kodam due to its strategic geographic location.

    He said the Army was currently processing the acquisition of 24 Bell 412s, which will be assembled by state aircraft manufacturer PT Dirgantara Indonesia, was also negotiating the purchase of US-made 20 Blackhawk helicopters.

    He also said that the Army would send Anoa armored personnel carriers (APCs), made by state arms producer PT Pindad, to replace older APCs.

    Army to increase firepower in Bukit Barisan | The Jakarta Post
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    Almuchalif Suryo: Dedicating his life to peace
    Nani Afrida, The Jakarta Post, Jakarta | People | Thu, February 21 2013, 12:45 PM


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    (JP/Nani Afrida)(JP/Nani Afrida)Col. Almuchalif Suryo dreamed of being a peacekeeper since he was a little boy.

    At that time, Suryo saw a group of soldiers who were about to go to Vietnam and Sinai in the Middle East on peace missions. They wore blue berets and light brown uniforms with the Indonesian flag on them. The color of their uniforms was totally different to the usual Indonesian Military (TNI) color of green.

    “I was the son of a military man and grew up in a military neighborhood. Seeing soldiers with different uniforms, particularly with the Indonesian flag on it, attracted me,” the 42-year-old told The Jakarta Post recently, smiling.

    After Suryo grew up, the idea to be a peacekeeper became more reasonable.

    “Actually, I wanted to be a peacekeeper because the duty is unique and challenging as we have to help maintain peace in foreign countries that have different situations from Indonesia,” he said.

    His dream has finally come true. Starting this year, Suryo will work at the United Nations Department of Peacekeeping Operations (DPKO) in New York. He will be the first Indonesian military officer to work in the department, which oversees peacekeeping operations around the world.

    For the next two-and-a-half years, Suryo will work as a planning officer with the military planning service in the office of military affairs at the DPKO.

    “The DPKO chose me after an intense selection process. I had to compete with 146 candidates from around the world to secure the position,” said Suryo, who loves reading and adventure activities, adding that the process had taken a long time and lots of energy.

    “This proves that Indonesian military officers have the opportunity to work in senior positions within UN peace operations,” he said, failing to conceal his happiness.

    Of course, his previous experience as a military observer in war zones helped him to secure the job.

    Suryo started his career in close proximity to peace missions in 1999, working as a liaison officer to both the UN Mission in East Timor (UNAMET) and the International Force for East Timor (Interfet). During this posting, he participated in the negotiations to free the local military commander of Soibada in East Timor (now Timor Leste), Capt. Artawan, who had been abducted by the National Council of Timorese Resistance (CNRT).

    His role in East Timor also included working in a joint TNI and Interfet investigation into the so-called Montain incident, which had resulted in the death of a police officer.

    “During my tour of duty in East Timor, I had no experience as a military observer for the UN. But it convinced me that I was capable enough to work as a military observer,” he said.

    Suryo was then appointed as a military observer for Sierra Leone in 2002-2003. Thereafter, he obtained further experience in peacekeeping missions after joining the UN Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) in 2009.

    The officer, who holds a master’s degree in diplomacy and military science from the University of Norwich in Vermont, the US, currently works as operational planning director at the Indonesian Peacekeeping Center (IPC).

    Indonesia, which has sent soldiers to a number of peacekeeping missions since 1957, aims to send out 4,000 peacekeepers by 2014, including more experts.

    During his time as a military observer, the father of two had many interesting experiences including how to deal with rebels. In some countries, like Sierra Leone, Suryo met child soldiers who turned their weapons on him.

    “They were so young but were used to killing people. In the end, they were only children who smiled when I gave them some free candy,” he said.

    Suryo said the biggest challenge for him during his overseas missions was the culture shock. He not only had to face people from vastly different backgrounds in the various conflict zones but he also had to work with peacekeepers from a number of different countries.

    “The language barrier was a serious problem. We all spoke English but with different accents and sometimes that created different meanings,” he said laughing.

    As peacekeepers often have to work in challenging and remote areas that are very difficult to access, using walkie-talkies (more formally known as handheld transceivers) is a must for them.

    However, using walkie-talkies often exacerbate the language barrier. Sometimes officers cannot understand each other when they try to communicate.

    Suryo had a funny experience while on one of his peace missions. The new duty officers kept complaining about the walkie-talkies.

    “I was surprised that all the new duty officers complained that their walkie-talkie was broken. When I asked a technician to repair the equipment, they said nothing was wrong with it,” he recalled, adding that he finally realized that the problem lay in the officers’ difficulties coping with different accents.

    Suryo believes that a military man like himself can be involved in peace missions although many people only view soldiers as fighters.

    “Soldiers must know how to change their mind-sets based on certain operations. We are not only fighters but also warriors in bringing peace,” he said smiling.

    Almuchalif Suryo: Dedicating his life to peace | The Jakarta Post


    Indonesia earmarks 1.56 bln USD for army modernization in 2013
    Souce:Xinhua Publish By Thomas Whittle Updated 15/02/2013 3:52 am in World


    JAKARTA, Feb. 13 — The Indonesian House of Representatives has approved a military budget worth 1.56 billion U.S. dollars to update Indonesia’s weapons system this year, aiming to strengthen and modernize the country’s military arsenal, an army general said Wednesday.

    Army Chief of Staff Pramono Edhie Wibowo said the 1.56 billion U.S. dollars budget approved was to buy new weapons and replace the old ones simultaneously by phase in 2013.

    “The army will acquire 24 units of helicopters of 412 type, Leopard tanks, cannons and rockets with a firing range of up to 100 kilometers,” Pramono said, adding that negotiations are in progress for the purchase of 20 units of helicopters of black hawk type.

    Indonesia’s Antara news agency quoted the General Pramono as saying that the army would start buying the equipment directly from the producing countries in line with the procedure and the equipment would be distributed by phase to various regions which need modernization of weapons system.

    As the biggest country and economy in Southeast Asia, Indonesia has begun to leverage its growing economy to overhaul its aging military hardware. Indonesia raised its defense budget to 8 billion U.S. dollars for 2013, a 6.6 percent increase from last year.

    http://www.nzweek.com/world/indonesia-earmarks-1-56-bln-usd-for-army-modernization-in-2013-48998/
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  11. MacanJawa
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    ARRIVAL of two Sukhoi Su 30 "BATCH 3"

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  12. Reashot Xigwin
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    More news about the Sukhois :tup:

    Air Force gets two Sukhoi jet fighters, waits for four more
    Andi Hajramurni and Novan Iman Santosa, The Jakarta Post, Makassar/Jakarta | Archipelago | Mon, February 25 2013, 9:23 AM


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    Out of the cocoon: The body of a Sukhoi SU-30 MK2 jet fighter jet is unloaded in disassembled condition from Antonov An-124-100 Ruslan strategic transport aircraft at Sultan Hasanuddin Air Force Base in Makassar, early Saturday morning. Two jet fighters were delivered on Friday evening as part of a batch of six jet fighters. (Courtesy of Sultan Hasanuddin Air Force Base)

    Two out of the six Sukhoi Su-30 MK2 jet fighters ordered by the Indonesian Air Force (TNI AU) arrived at Sultan Hasanuddin Air Force Base in Makassar late on Friday evening.

    A spokesman from the base, Maj. Muliadi, said on Saturday the two jet fighters were part of an order of six Su-30 MK2s arriving in batches.

    “The remaining four jet fighters will arrive in June and July,” he said.

    The Russian-made jet fighters arrived onboard An-12-100 Ruslan strategic transport aircraft in disassembled condition and without engines. The engines are scheduled to arrive on Feb. 27 for the entire six jet fighters, totaling 12 engines.

    In addition to the two jet fighters made by Komsomolsk-na Amure Aircraft Production Association (KNAPO), 17 technicians from the aircraft manufacturers will assemble the jet fighters.

    Muliadi said the assembly process would take two weeks to complete, including test flights.

    The Su-30 MK2 is a twin-engine, dual-seater jet fighter with a range of some 3,000 kilometers and is able to carry a payload of some eight tons.

    As with previous shipments, the jet fighters do not come with weapons, other than internal cannons.

    “The weapons will be purchased separately after the jet fighters are assembled, just like other batches,” Muliadi said.

    Defense analysts have criticized the separate acquisition of the jet fighters, which do not include weapons such as bombs and missiles.

    The government, however, said budget constraints had limited its ability to buy a complete package.

    With the two jet fighters, now Indonesia has six single-seater Su-27 SKMs and six Su-30 MK2s.

    The Su-27/30 jet fighters are known as “Flankers”.

    By the end of this year, there will be 16 jet fighters of this type under the command of the 11th Squadron.

    The fighters have been arriving in batches since 2003, starting with Su-27 SKM, which arrived at Iswahjudi Air Force Base in Madiun, East Java.

    The home base of the fighters was then moved to Makassar in 2005, making the deliveries of the heavyweight jet fighters direct to Makassar since 2009, 2010 and 2013.

    The government is currently improving its air force assets both in jet fighter and transport roles to augment and replace ageing aircraft.

    Other than increasing the number of Flankers, the TNI AU is also expecting the delivery of 24 F-16 C/D Block 25, granted by the US. Indonesia will be responsible for bearing the cost of modernizing the lightweight, multi-role aircraft.

    Indonesia currently has 10 F-16 A/B Block 15 OCUs, in the Third Squadron, which were acquired in 1989. These jet fighters will also undergo modernization.

    In September, the TNI AU received four EMB-324 Super Tucano ground attack aircraft out of 16 ordered from Brazilian aircraft maker Embraer. Joining the 21st Squadron, the aircraft are a replacement for the legendary American-made Rockwell OV-10 Bronco.

    Another new acquisition is the T-50 Golden Eagle lead-in fighter trainer (LIFT) aircraft from the Korean Aerospace Industry, to replace the British-made BAE Hawk Mk 53 in the 15th Squadron.

    Indonesia will receive four C-130H Hercules heavy lift transport aircraft granted by Australia and will buy another six. Indonesia currently has two squadrons of Hercules, the 31st and 32nd.

    Indonesia has also received two C-295 medium lift transport aircraft out of nine aircraft ordered from Spain-based Airbus Military in cooperation with state aircraft maker PT Dirgantara Indonesia, which will make the aircraft in Bandung. The C-295 will join the CN-235 and Fokker F-27 in the second squadron.

    Air Force gets two Sukhoi jet fighters, waits for four more | The Jakarta Post
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  13. Reashot Xigwin
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    Revitalizing Indonesia’s arms production at a time of international sales decrease
    Anton Aliabbas and Fitri Bintang Timur, Jakarta/Singapore | Opinion | Tue, February 26 2013, 9:06 AM

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    Indonesia defense minister Purnomo Yugisdiantoro holding a PT Pindad made SS4 Semi-Automatic rifle.

    Early this week, the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) published its Top 100 list of arms-producing companies in the world. The report shows an international decline of weapons sales for the first time since the 9/11 tragedy, based on year-to-year comparisons.

    Arms sales reached a total of US$410 billion in 2011, 5 percent lower than the year before. Reasons for this sales decrease include the austerity measures implemented in North America and Western European countries, which significantly cut many countries’ defense spending; the withdrawal of coalition forces from Iraq and Afghanistan; and the United Nations Security Council’s sanctions on Libya.

    Of the top 100 arms producers, 44 are US-based companies that control 60 percent of the total sales; 30 are Western-European companies, which control 29 percent of the sales, while there are only 13 Asian companies controlling 5 percent of the sales. Based on SIPRI data,the highest performers in Asian defense are Japan (five companies), South Korea (four), India (three) and Singapore (one).

    Last year, Indonesia issued Law No. 16/2012 on the defense industry that aims to revitalize local strategic companies to be able to compete with international companies’ sales. How local companies react in the face of the declining arms procurement remains to be seen when even established global sellers struggle to make it work, especially when calls that Indonesian defense actors buy locally produced arms remain neglected.

    Of course, we have to appreciate the law for its strong spirit to improve our defense industries and also to meet the need of main weaponry-system procurement. This spirit is reflected in some paragraphs that clearly refer to local content, countertrade and offset (article 43 paragraph 5), and show a preference for domestic arms products (article 43 paragraph 1).

    However, this law still has some problems. First, the existing ambiguity in regulating the development of our defense industries. On the one hand, the government (read: security actors) is encouraged to buy
    and use domestic arms products. But, on the other hand, this law does not give any sanctions to users if they buy weapons from foreign countries.

    Actually, when the House of Representatives deliberated this law, sanctions against negligence were among the hot topics discussed. Some parties forcefully asked that sanctions be imposed on users who refuse to buy domestic products. Some parties, including the government, opposed the idea. Unfortunately, after much lobbying the House and the government agreed to drop that clause.

    Second, the explicit number of countertrade, offset and local content seems difficult to be implemented. Article 43 paragraph 5 (e) regulates on countertrade, local content and/or offset of at least 85 percent. Paragraph 5 (f) regulates on a minimum 35 percent of local content and offset with an increase of 10 percent for every five years. This section is unrealistic because the government never buys main weapons on a large scale, so it will be hard to demand offset and countertrade from foreign industries.

    Third, the transitional period for industries to restructure and improve their financial performance within two years will also trigger problems. Two years is not enough for industries to make their business “healthier” and better.

    Since the law has been enacted, there has been no significant progress reported. It is difficult to see how Indonesian defense producers can catch up with the technology, although the law regulates on strategic countertrade, joint-collaboration and offset for every weapon system procured abroad.

    These strategies will be used to gain technological leverage that the country is still lacking. However, the catch with this law is that Indonesia should buy in bulk or buy more expensive arms to demand producers share their technological advantage. Even then the producers are only willing to share limited information on low-tech and high-manual work, but not the core component that Indonesia can sustainably base its strategic industry on.

    Referring to the offset scheme stipulated in this law, we are projected to have strong defense industries that could produce our main weaponry system independently by 2049. This is such a good dream. But, it needs the government’s consistency and political will to support and involve our defense industry in any arms purchasing.

    In fact, it does not happen. When President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono visited the United Kingdom last year, the government agreed to purchase sniper rifles from there.

    However, PT Pindad will not be able to completely produce that kind of weapon as it will still need to import rifle scope parts. If the government has a strong commitment to improve the capacity of PT Pindad, President Yudhoyono should have developed cooperation in making scopes for sniper rifles in Indonesia.

    In the eyes of the skeptics, Indonesia’s law on the defense industry is only a facade to increase arms procurements and thus, open more probabilities for persons-in-charge to tap into the commission, rather than genuinely supporting local strategic chains.

    However, several defense experts also think that Indonesian rusty fleets are in need of rejuvenation (Connie Bakrie 2009, Andi Widjajanto, 2012) and “buying the technology before producing” is commonly practiced by countries having defense companies listed in the Top 100, including South Korea and India.

    If not collaborating with the established strategic industries, Indonesia has the option to go it alone, like North Korea, with a very slim chance to succeed. Consequently, defenders of foreign purchase are persuasively pushing their agenda by luring technology transfer through offset. If the integrity of Indonesian defense procurers and their negotiation skills are guaranteed, the country might gain more from the scaling down of the arms market. The producers are desperate for buyers and the SIPRI report also mentioned that these companies pursue future opportunities in Latin America, the Middle East and Asia.

    There are four keys to secure foreign arms procurement that will benefit Indonesia in the long run. First, it needs to be wary of procuring weapon systems that are obsolete, incompatible and unsuitable with Indonesia’s existing fleet, terrains or perceived threats only because they are cheap or filling the pockets of the elites.

    Second, the country’s strategic industries should look at cyber-security as an emerging market. The field is gaining popularity as data protection, network software and simulation test programs play more important roles in contemporary state defense. Entry to this market is relatively less expensive in contrast to building hardware kits such as main-battle tank or fighter plane as intelligence is the essence.

    Third, to boost production, industries really need routine long-term contracts with simple administration processes from the government. This action should be followed by a commitment and willingness of the Indonesian banking sector to fund the contract.

    Lastly, Indonesia needs to develop its local value chains to supply big strategic industries such as PT DI, PT PAL, PT Pindad and so on. Without it, the growth of these companies will be hampered by high import costs as they cannot obtain the materials domestically. The same advancement on our human resources — via appropriate skills training — also needs to be pursued. No doubt, on the intelligence level, Indonesia is ready to compete.

    Anton Aliabbas is an associate faculty member of Binus International, Bina Nusantara University, Indonesia. Fitri Bintang Timur is a researcher at the Rajaratnam School of International Studies, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. Both hold master’s degrees on defense studies from the Bandung Institute of Technology-Cranfield University.

    Revitalizing Indonesia
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  14. nufix
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    2013, National Police gets USD 4.7 billion for budget

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    Indonesian Female Police


    JAKARTA, KOMPAS.com - Indonesian National Police (INP) has a budget in 2013 of Rp 45.6 trillion (USD 4.7 billion). The budget is smaller than the proposed budget of Rp 51.761 trillion (USD 5.3 billion)

    "The budget given to the police in carrying out their duties as much as 88.14 percent of the ideal police proposal. Proposed ideal budget is Rp 51.761 trillion (USD 5.3 billion) and the initial approved budget is 45.622 or 88.14 percent of it, "says Infrastructure Assistant Inspector General of Police at Police Headquarters Sulistyo Ishak, South Jakarta, Friday (25/01/2013).

    Sulistyo explained that the budget will be allocated to personnel expenses, shopping goods, and capital expenditures. Personnel expenditure of Rp 29.859 trillion, or 65.45 per cent, spending on goods Rp 8.940 trillion or 19.60 percent, and capital expenditure of Rp 6.821 trillion or 14.95 percent.

    In addition, police also received funds amounting to Rp 2.219 trillion optimization which includes operational benefits inquiries and investigations of the Corruption of Rp 250 billion.

    "It was used to support 13 programs and 89 activities, also for 31 police," he explained.

    In addition, the Head of Public Relations Division Police Inspector General Suhardi Alius said, police will conduct transparent budgets. Various parties are also welcome to oversee the use of funds in 2013.

    "Transparency of goods and services has been carried out in the Police and may be followed by anyone," said Suhardi.
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