Indian Space Capabilities

Discussion in 'Indian Defence Forum' started by joey, Oct 20, 2006.

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  1. niaz
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    niaz PDF THINK TANK: CONSULTANT

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    To give credit where it is due; Indians have been in this business much longer than we have. I remember reading about Indian Missile/Rocket research program back in the sixties when I was still a student. Think there was also a mock up of first Indian space rocket at the Sciece museum next to Natural History museum building in London.

    I was presented a copy autobiography of Dr Abul Kalam, now President of India by a friend which in a way is also history of Indain Space research.
    Apparently Indian Rocket program had started as early as Pandit Nehru era.
  2. Contrarian
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    Contrarian ELITE MEMBER

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    Yes, do you know there is a CLASSIC foto...i cant find it now.

    There were humble beginings for India...The FIRST satellite was taken to the launch center in Orrisa on a BICYCLE!

    I cant find that image now...its such a beautiful image and classic image...nostalgic. It was published in Hindu once.
  3. Lilo
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    Lilo FULL MEMBER

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    Here's the foto u were talkin abt malay..

    [​IMG]

    :cheers:
  4. Contrarian
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    Contrarian ELITE MEMBER

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    Yeh dude, its the same one, but could you find the foto itself?
  5. gpit
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    gpit SENIOR MEMBER

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    Congratulations, dude. Especially the remote sensing stuff.
  6. Neo
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    Neo RETIRED

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    'Space ties with India, a win-win situation'
    15 May, 2007

    WASHINGTON: Senior officials of the NASA and scientists have told American law makers that there is a lot of merit in increasing international cooperation with leading space powers like India that will only see a win-win situation which benefits the United States and the partnering country.

    At the same time at least one senior Republican law maker has voiced scepticism of going about with cooperation with such countries like China and Pakistan on the grounds that "tyrants and dictatorships" are actually a threat to the values of western civilisation.

    At a recent Congressional hearing on Space programmes, Democratic Congressman Mark Udall asked Alan Stern, the Associate Administrator for the Science Mission Directorate of the NASA, to assess international collaboration as a means to advance the priorities of National Academy's decadal surveys.

    Stern said the US was ready to talk with any country who was on an acceptable list, who had a space programme and capability that could fly instruments or collaborate in missions.

    "And I mean that to be a win-win -- certainly, Asian nations like the Japanese and the Indians, who are space powers, the European Space Agency, the individual European national space programmes, the Canadian Space Agency and others all come to mind," he said.

    Vice Provost of Physical Science and Engineering at Cornell University Joseph Burns said within one year the world will have three foreign spacecraft in orbit around the moon -- Japan, China and India.

    "And they will provide a very significant part of our new kinds of understanding of what the moon is all about and thereby aid our exploration programme. I think we need to carry that into other spheres," he said.

    But senior Republican law maker Dana Rohrabacher of California argued that while he was all for cooperation between scientists from "free" and "democratic" countries, the United States would have to be "very, very cautious" in training scientists who will return to "dictatorships" and create a threat to western civilisation.

    "Whether or not it's a bomb in Pakistan, I would hate to think that we had Pakistani scientists here and trained them how to make that bomb.

    "I would hate to think that democratic countries like our own would use our science and so indiscriminately provide information that we provide the means for a dictatorship like China to set up a computer system that will spy on its own people and put believers in God in jail and be able to control the internet in their societies when they couldn't have done it without our help -- things such as that," Rohrabacher said.

    "So I would just like to make sure that we balance off. Pure science isn't an end in and of itself. If it works with people who are tyrants and negative forces on this world, that science is not a good thing to transmit to those people," the senior Republican in the House Panel on Science and Technology said.

    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...a_a_win-win_situation/articleshow/2046402.cms
  7. kvLin
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    kvLin SENIOR MEMBER

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    It is no strange for Dana Rohrabacher to put political stuffs into anything anytime. He is an ultra-antiChina,throttlehold drum beater as well as chairman of Taiwan caucus. one of his notable snarl states that "China is more dangerous than Muslim". never expect a man in such position can make a decent definition of space science.
  8. Interceptor
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    Interceptor SENIOR MEMBER

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    The Indians have also place the first Indian long before, they joined with Russian astronautes, the Indians are well established in the Space field.

    Ill post the info on the first Indian in Space I believe it was was probably in the 10s or 80s.
  9. Interceptor
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    Interceptor SENIOR MEMBER

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    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 5, 2013
  10. Neo
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    Neo RETIRED

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    The manned space program of the Indian Space Research Organisation has depended entirely upon Russia, and the first Indian cosmonaut became the 138th man into space, he spent eight days in space aboard Salyut 7. Launched along with two other Soviet cosmonauts aboard Soyuz T-11 on 02 April 1984, was then-Squadron Leader Rakesh Sharma, a 35 year old Indian Air Force pilot. During the flight, Squadron Leader Sharma conducted multi-spectral photography of northern India in anticipation of the construction of hydroelectric power stations in the Himalayas.

    Squadron Leader Sharma and his backup, Wing Commander Ravish Malhotra, also prepared an elaborate series of zero-gravity Yoga exercises which the former had practised aboard the Salyut 7. Retired with the rank of Wing Commander, Rakesh Sharma joined Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) as a test pilot. He was based at the Aircraft & Systems Testing Establishment (ASTE) in Bangalore and worked on the indigenous Light Combat Aircraft program. Current status - retired.

    R, Sharma

    [​IMG]
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  11. joey
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    joey SENIOR MEMBER

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    I'm against subsequent manned space mission, but I'm for for one manned space mission as it gives you insight into space medicines, which DIPAS a lab of DRDO has already worked upon, also the zero gravity centre, now boy o boy where do sign up? :D

  12. joey
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    joey SENIOR MEMBER

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  13. Neo
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    Neo RETIRED

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    What is the best place in India to get Aeronautical education, Bengalore?

    [​IMG]
  14. joey
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    joey SENIOR MEMBER

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    no, it depends Neo, Are you talking of Aeronautical or Aerospace?
    If Aeronautical the IIT's gives you and bachelors is best from there then you can get into job orinted work.

    While in PHD, research et al, it is NAL/IISC/TIFR etc etc, NAL is highly respected instution, It is National Aerospace Limited, but i think they takes peoples after Phd or soemthing, one of my cousin is in NAL, he stood first in VIT in Bangalore and recieved prize from Kalam saab.

    In Aeronautics you have NAL/HAL/ADA/ARDB these all are for research et al and involved in strategic projects.

    Normally after Education people get into job oriented work and there are a lot of instutions giving you out works.

    These days even HAL has seperate r&d workshop.

    ARDB has some very nifty projects in its hand, you can check out the projects from drop down menu from their website..
    http://www.drdo.com/boards/ardb/index.htm


    Take for example the instutions working on LCA..

    [​IMG]

    It is de-centralised, It depends , what course you want to pursue, bachelors / masters et al from where...hehe.
  15. Neo
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    Neo RETIRED

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    First Indian Satellite: Aryabhatta Satellite

    37402d8ccccf1660ca10d986df9df14e.jpg

    Launch Date : April 19, 1975

    Weight : 360 kg

    Orbit : 619 x 562 km inclined at 50.7 deg

    Lauched by : Soviet Intercosmos rocket.

    Objectives : The objectives of this project were to indigenously design and fabricate a space-worthy satellite system and evaluate its perfromance in orbitr.

    * to evolve the methodology of conducting a series of complex operations on the satellite in its orbital phasei.

    * to set up ground-based receiving, transmitting and tracking systems

    and to establish infrastructure for the fabrication of spacecraft systems.

    The exercise also provided an opportunity to conduct investigations in the area of spcae sciences. The satellite carried three experiments, one each in X-Ray Astronomy, Solar Physics and Aeronomy.