India going to be one of the key powers of world: Blair Read more: India going to be

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  1. brahmastra
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    brahmastra SENIOR MEMBER

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    NEW DELHI: Tony Blair shares with Manmohan Singh his fondness for former US president George Bush. And, as he tells Indrani Bagchi in an exclusive interview, he shares with Bush a belief in India's future.

    Although "A Journey", Blair's controversial memoirs, barely mention India, the former British PM said, "I was very keen to move beyond the old-fashioned relationship... My view was India was going to be one of the key leading powers of the world in the times to come. The west in the 21st century, including countries like mine will have to get used to the fact that we're going to have partners who will be equals, sometimes more than equals."

    India doesn't actually figure in your book. Was India not high in your list of priorities as prime minister?

    Actually I was very keen to reshape our relationship with India. The reason I haven't got a lot of it in the book is that here I was dealing with the issues that were highly controversial, whereas I was seeing the Anglo-Indian relations as being supportive. I was very keen to move beyond the old-fashioned relationship and to strike a new partnership with India. I got on very well with Mr Vajpayee and then obviously with Manmohan Singh.

    My view over time was India was going to be one of the key leading powers of the world in the times to come and we had to create a strong relationship. It's true I also thought, because we worked very closely with America on the relationship with India, that Britain's relationship with India had to be partly seen through the prism of our relationship with America and not only our relationship with the European Union.

    In your book you mentioned Pakistan using terrorism as a state tool. When you were in government, how did you deal with this?

    We worked closely with the Pakistani government about it. I tried very hard to encourage a better relationship between India and Pakistan. But I was very conscious of the fact that India was suffering the consequences of terrorism, that terrorism was serious and I think, we in the west were pretty slow to wake up to the Indian experience and what it meant, not just for India, but for us.

    Given your experience with the Iraq war, what would be your recommendation for a resolution in Afghanistan?

    This is a struggle. It's a movement with a global ideology based on a perversion of Islam. It's hard because it's an asymmetrical study in warfare. It can't be beaten by simple conventional warfare. It's tough to beat, but it's important to recognize that if we don't beat it and we make any concession to it, it will only get stronger.

    What would you say to efforts to reconcile with the Taliban?

    We have to be really careful there. It depends on what terms we can reconcile. If they have terms that allow people to live decent lives, civilized lives and modernize the country, and there are elements of Taliban that can be integrated. But what we should be under no illusions about is if Afghanistan goes back under the influence of the Taliban, and they have reactionary view, refuse to have girls taught in schools, stone people to death for being in love, then we can't go down that path. I'm afraid that what we have to understand about this global terrorism that we've got is that it's a generation-long struggle. We have to commit not just resources, but political will to see it through and get it knocked out.

    Do you see some of that political will wavering under the burden of the economic crisis?

    That makes it tougher, but the thing that makes it toughest is that the battle fought against terrorism, suicide attacks, roadside bombs, in many ways is a dispiriting battle. It's hard. It's a tough, long battle. But that's just the nature of it, I'm afraid and we can't give up on it, because if we do, then the very people within these countries, in the region, the people that are fighting this menace, they will give up if we give up.

    Is this a message you would give to the powers across the Atlantic?

    That's true. That's why, I think India's got a lot to teach the world at the moment, actually. And shape the world opinion on this. Lot of people focus on the Indian economy and its diversity, and so on, and all that is true and absolutely right. But it's also what India has got to teach is in terms of culture, in terms of peaceful co-existence between religions and in terms of dealing with this struggle against terrorism.

    As a statesman, give us a grand sweep of the world as you see it for the foreseeable future?

    There are two major changes that have come home to me after I left office. One is the shift of global power to the east, to Asia, to countries like India and China. And the west in the 21st century, including countries like mine will have to get used to the fact that we're going to have partners who will be equals, sometimes more than equals.

    It might be challenging for us actually, but we've got to come to terms with that and realize that in the end the geopolitics of the world has changed fundamentally, and for good. Secondly, we have to acknowledge that this extremist threat is still here, it's real and it's not going away. We need to double our efforts to confront this. It's a global threat based on an ideology. It may be based on a perversion of Islam, but the fact is, it's a strain within Islam. And that is a difficult thing to say but it's necessary to say it. Only by saying it do we understand it and then we can confront it effectively.

    India going to be one of the key powers of world: Blair - The Times of India
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  2. Cityboy
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    Cityboy FULL MEMBER

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    Hmm. So much love for us. . Its not abt the biggest democracy, free media, 2nd largest population etc. .. . The reasons for Great love by west lies in our market $$$ and also wants to use india to counter china. . .i hope our babus understand this. Sorry uncle sam, we wont fight with china for you like what others did for you.
  3. somebozo
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    somebozo ELITE MEMBER

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    So when are brits coming back to colonise?
  4. IndianArmy
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    IndianArmy PROFESSIONAL

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    India is Obviously Going to be a Power, It was and Is the dream of Independent India, Many Countries already Recognize India as a Budding Superpower
  5. INDIAISM
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    One in five of UK's richest under-40 is of Indian origin on 23-05-2008 23:19


    It is not the UK's billionaire club alone, which is led by NRI families like Mittals and Hindujas, even the younger rich brigade, all below 40 years of age, in Britain has a plenty of Indian origin people.

    In the Daily Telegraph's annual list of Britain's 40 richest young entrepreneurs -- 'Made It By 40' -- at least eight have their origin in India with a combined wealth of about one billion dollars.
    While two of those with Indian origin have made their debut this year, three others have seen their net worth increasing in the past one year.

    Richest among those with Indian origin, Baljinder Kaur Boparan has been ranked 9th in the overall list with a worth of 130 million pounds, up from 115 million pounds a year ago.

    Boparan and her husband Ranjit wholly own a chicken- processing company, Boparan Holdings, whose brands include Buxted chicken. Its turnover in 2006 rose to 377 million pounds and pre-tax profits were 22.3 million pounds.

    Besides, Arif and Munaf Patels, the brothers who own Faisaltex group of companies that supplies socks, underwear and other children's clothing to discount stores throughout the UK, have debuted at 15th position with 90 million pounds.

    The list comprises of UK entrepreneurs or foreign-born citizens having spent most of their lives working in Britain and whose main income source and place of business is here. Besides, to make it to the list, one must be 40 years or less.

    The person who topped the last year's list, Sir Stelios Haji-Ioannou -- is not present in the latest rankings as he "is now too old to feature on the 2008 list" after turning 41.

    Even this year's winner, Moneysupermarket Group's Simon Nixxon with a net worth of 363 million pounds, may not find a place next year as he is already 40.

    In this year's list, one-fourth are Asian entrepreneurs, which the newspaper said "illustrates a growing trend," although not a radical change from the previous lists.

    Separately, India-born Lakshmi Mittal, who heads the world's largest steelmaker ArcelorMittal, has been named the UK's richest person for fourth year in a row, as per the annual Sunday Times Rich List released this weekend.

    Sunday Times Rich List has also named Sri and Gopi Hinduja, who run one of the world's most diversified business groups run by an NRI family, as the fourth richest in the UK.

    However, unlike Daily Telegraph's "Made It By 40" list, the Sunday Times rankings do not have any age-specific criteria and includes people from all the age groups.

    The eight persons of India origin on Daily Telegraph's under-40 richest list also includes at 22nd position Sanjay Kumar, whose family owns a textiles firm Rajan Group. His worth has dipped to 70 million pounds, from 82 million pounds, as the company's turnover declined and losses widened.

    Besides, Mayank Patel of Currencies Direct, a billion- pound foreign exchange specialist, has debuted at 25th position with a worth of 67 million pounds.

    Patel is followed by Sanjay Vadera at 26th rank with a worth of 66 million pound. He sold 65 per cent of his perfume distribution firm Per-Scent for 42 million pound in 2005.

    The list has at 28th position Sanjeev Mehan, Raj Sehgal and family, whose Visage Holdings is a South Shields based fashion enterprise and are worth about 63 million pounds.
    Raj Chatha, who heads Halifax-based European Food Brokers, a major wine and beer firm, has been ranked 34th with 57 million pound.

    Sandeep Chadha and family, has been ranked 35th. With an estimated wealth of 56 million pounds, Chadha runs Supreme Brand Group, one of the UK's largest batteries sellers.


    i don't think i need to say any thing else thn :cheers:
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  6. Agent X
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    Not today but maybe tomorrow we will have to fight with chinese in that case having western high tech weapons will be a big help for our armed forces. We don't need to sale our country but having good relations with west won't hurt us.
  7. Ganga
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    Ganga FULL MEMBER

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    I think i have said this before as well and i am saying it again.Get out of the world of jealousy.
  8. Syama Ayas
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    Syama Ayas ELITE MEMBER

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    Lets be a global power first.
  9. nForce
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    nForce SENIOR MEMBER

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    Isnt it the other way around????


    An Indian now owns East India Company



    It's been a long, emotional and personal journey for Sanjiv Mehta, a Mumbai-born entrepreneur who completed the process of buying the East India Company (EIC) in 2005 from the "30 or 40" people who owned it.

    Acutely aware that he owned a piece of history - at its height the company generated half of world trade and employed a third of the British workforce - Mehta, now the sole owner, dived into the company's rich and ruthless past in order to give it a new direction for the future.

    With a $15-million investment and inputs from a range of experts - from designers and brand researchers to historians - Mehta is today poised to open the first East India Company store in London's upmarket Mayfair neighbourhood in March.

    And then there is the inevitable - and daunting - task of launching in India, a country whose resources, army, trade and politics the company had controlled for some 200 years.

    It's a task that Mehta has not taken lightly, he told in an interview. "Put yourself in my shoes for a moment: On a rational plane, when I bought the company I saw gold at the end of the rainbow.?

    "But, at an emotional level as an Indian, when you think with your heart as I do, I had this huge feeling of redemption - this indescribable feeling of owning a company that once owned us."

    The formal start of the East India Company is usually dated back to 1600 when Britain's Queen Elizabeth I granted a group of merchants a charter under the name 'The Company of Merchants of London Trading into the East Indies.'

    With its own Elizabethan coat of arms - now owned by Mehta - the company was made responsible for bringing tea, coffee and luxury goods to the West and trading in spices across the globe.

    By 1757 the company had become a powerful arm of British imperial might, with its own army, navy, shipping fleets and currency, and control over key trading posts in India - where it was known variously as Company Bahadur and John Company. In 1874, the British government nationalised the company, opportunistically blaming the 1857 uprising on its excesses. But the East India Company army, brought under the command of the Crown, retained its all-powerful presence in India.

    "When I took over the company, my objective was to understand its history. I took a sabbatical from all other business and this became the single purpose in my life," said Mehta.

    He travelled around the world, visiting former EIC trading posts and museums, reading up records and meeting people "who understood the business of that time".
    "There was a huge sense of responsibility - I didn't create this brand, but I wanted to be as pioneering as the merchants who created it."

    "The Elizabethan coat of arms stands for trust and reassurance, but we are not repeating history. It took me four years to do the brand positioning and put up the milestones."

    The 'relaunched' company, with its headquarters on Conduit Street in Mayfair, is set to open a diverse line of high-end, luxury goods in London in March and in India some time this year.

    EIC products in India will include fine foods, furniture, real estate, health and hospitality.
    "India is the spirit of the East India Company in many ways - it evokes a huge amount of connectivity and emotions," Mehta said "It's also a major ambition to bring Indian products to the rest of the world. Today there is no single brand name from the East that can stand alongside, say, Hermes or Cartier from the West.
    "The East India Company has that ability."


    Source
  10. Time Assassin
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    Well India is defiently on the rise, the BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India and China). Are all set to have Great Powers before 2025. But China and India will be the lead players along with the US.

    As soon as the BRIC is in Power then will come MINP (Mexico, Indonisia, Nigeria and Pakistan). The Power Game is shifting to the East especially in Asia.
  11. nForce
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    nForce SENIOR MEMBER

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    I will be nice to see a developed South Asia where peace prevails,isnt it???:cheers::cheers:

    Can you tell me more about MINP???
  12. Time Assassin
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    Well the MINP is sort off in a swingy mode if you know wat i mean.

    Mexico is often in the BRMIC

    and there is NIP (Nigeria, Indonisia and Pakistan), NAP (Nigeria, Algeria and Pakistan) and MIP (Mexico, Indonisia and Pakistan).

    These are all countries either a Semi-Industriziled or Newly Industriziled. They are Emergining Economies but are not as big as the BRIC however they are Developing consitanly better than what the IMF and World Bank expect them too. All the MINP countries are set to be devolpt by 2025, however there are problems now happening in Pakistan and Mexico, so we could say it will take till 2030. If you know what the BRIC are then you can say the MINP is the lesser version of the BRIC.

    You Should check out D8 or N11. Its more easier to understand than the MINP.
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  13. dekho
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    Gentlemen! Lets Prosper.
  14. DesiGuy
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    TO Indians:

    Please report it, if its trolling. :coffee:
  15. brahmastra
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    brahmastra SENIOR MEMBER

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    title edited!.....:lol:
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