India blackout worsens; 620M in dark

Discussion in 'Central & South Asia' started by MBI Munshi, Jul 31, 2012.

  1. MBI Munshi

    MBI Munshi PDF THINK TANK: ANALYST

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2007
    Messages:
    8,579
    Ratings:
    +5 / 5,120 / -0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Location:
    Bangladesh
    (CBS/AP) NEW DELHI - India's energy crisis spread over half the country Tuesday when three of its electricity grids collapsed, leaving some 620 million people without power in one of the world's biggest-ever blackouts.

    The power failure has raised serious concerns about India's outdated infrastructure and the government's inability to meet an insatiable appetite for energy as the country aspires to become a regional economic superpower.

    The outage in the eastern grid came just a day after India's northern power grid collapsed for several hours. (Click on the player at left for a full report). Indian officials managed to restore power several hours later, but at 1:05 p.m. Tuesday the northern grid collapsed again, said Shailendre Dubey, an official at the Uttar Pradesh Power Corp. in India's largest state. About the same time, the eastern grid failed as well, said S.K. Mohanty, a power official in the eastern state of Orissa. Those two grids alone serve about half India's population.

    CBS News' Sanjay Jha reports that a third grid also failed on Tuesday, and Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee of the West Bengal state told reporters "hundreds" of miners had been trapped in mines operated by the government-owned Eastern Coalfields Ltd. in Burdwan, about 110 miles northwest of Kolkata.

    About 5,00,000 railway passengers were stranded across India as 300 trains ground to a halt, says Jha. In West Bengal, express trains and local electric trains were stopped at stations across the state on the eastern grid. Crowds of people thronged the stations, waiting for any transport to take them to their destinations.

    Traffic lights went out across New Delhi. The city's Metro rail system, which serves about 1.8 million people a day, immediately shut down for the second day in a row. Police said they managed to evacuate Delhi's busy Barakhamba Road station in under half an hour before closing the shutters.

    S.K. Jain, 54, said he was on his way to file his income tax return when the Metro closed and now would almost certainly miss the deadline.

    The new power failure affected 620 million people across 20 of India's 28 states -- about double the population of the United States. The blackout was unusual in its reach, stretching from the border with Myanmar in the northeast to the Pakistani border about 3,000 kilometers (1,870 miles) away. Its impact, however, was softened by Indians' familiarity with frequent blackouts and the widespread use of backup generators for major businesses and key facilities such as hospitals and airports.

    Power Minister Sushil Kumar Shinde blamed the new collapse on states taking more than their allotted share of electricity.

    "Everyone overdraws from the grid. Just this morning I held a meeting with power officials from the states and I gave directions that states that overdraw should be punished. We have given instructions that their power supply could be cut," he told reporters.

    Shinde later said power was fully restored in the northeast grid four hours after it went down, and that the north grid had 45 percent power and the east grid 35 percent. R.N. Nayak, chairman of Power Grid Corp., which runs the nation's power system, said he expected to have full power later in the evening.

    Oddly, as the crisis dragged into the evening, Shinde was promoted, becoming India's home minister, its top internal security official. The promotion had been planned previously as part of a greater Cabinet shuffle before he presided over the world's two worst power outages.

    Tuesday's blackout eclipsed Monday's in India, which covered territory including 370 million people. The third largest blackout affected 100 million people in Indonesia in 2005, according to reports by The Associated Press.

    India's demand for electricity has soared along with its economy in recent years, but utilities have been unable to meet the growing needs. India's Central Electricity Authority reported power deficits of more than 8 percent in recent months.

    The power deficit was worsened by a weak monsoon that lowered hydroelectric generation and kept temperatures higher, further increasing electricity usage as people seek to cool off.

    But any connection to the grid remains a luxury for many. One-third of India's households do not even have electricity to power a light bulb, according to last year's census.

    India blackout worsens; 620M in dark - CBS News




    Superpower!!! ..... LOLz


    :rofl::rofl::rofl:
     
  2. sr33jan

    sr33jan MEMBER

    New Recruit

    Joined:
    May 21, 2012
    Messages:
    49
    Ratings:
    +0 / 95 / -0
    don't you know so many threads already exist on this.:alcoholic:
    poor guy...:no:
     
  3. MBI Munshi

    MBI Munshi PDF THINK TANK: ANALYST

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2007
    Messages:
    8,579
    Ratings:
    +5 / 5,120 / -0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Location:
    Bangladesh
    Its so funny it needs another one ...... :lol:

    Now I know why you put your location as hell ..... ;)
     
  4. sr33jan

    sr33jan MEMBER

    New Recruit

    Joined:
    May 21, 2012
    Messages:
    49
    Ratings:
    +0 / 95 / -0
    lol...it power failure not load shedding unlike in your overpopulated country. Power have been restored in most of the places.
     
  5. MBI Munshi

    MBI Munshi PDF THINK TANK: ANALYST

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2007
    Messages:
    8,579
    Ratings:
    +5 / 5,120 / -0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Location:
    Bangladesh
    You mean power has been restored to the 400 million middle class Indians while the poor and destitute are still in the dark .....
     
  6. KRAIT

    KRAIT ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2012
    Messages:
    16,268
    Ratings:
    +1 / 26,326 / -1
    Country:
    India
    Location:
    India
    Another thread on same topic. Either MODS should make a sticky or start deleting these. BTW in India, where major part of population lives in villages, having no electricity or very limited, is not a concern. :enjoy:

    We are still happy.......:D

    Yeah, we give power to those who pay their bills and have electricity connection. It doesn't matter if they are rich or poor. If a person can't afford electricity then should we give them free electricity ? How is it economical ?

    Its power failure, the electricity lines and other infrastructure don't know how to distinguish who is middle class and who is poor and "destitute".
     
  7. MBI Munshi

    MBI Munshi PDF THINK TANK: ANALYST

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2007
    Messages:
    8,579
    Ratings:
    +5 / 5,120 / -0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Location:
    Bangladesh
    India's Power Grid Collapses Again

    NEW DELHI--Much of India's electricity supply network collapsed Tuesday in the country's second major outage in two days, affecting more than 680 million people—double the population of the U.S.—and causing business losses estimated to run into the hundreds of millions of dollars.

    Thousands of offices and factories had to switch to generators or shut shop, more than 200 trains were brought to a standstill while hospitals had to ask nurses to manually work critical equipment such as ventilators as 21 provinces experienced a near-total blackout that raised questions about the infrastructure in Asia's third-largest economy.

    Metro rail services in the national capital of New Delhi and its suburbs were halted for several hours as well, a spokesman for the Delhi Metro Rail Corp. said. At Delhi's international airport, diesel generators kicked in automatically to ensure operations were not interrupted.

    The power outage, the worst in India's history and affecting more than half its 1.2 billion population, was caused by the failure of power grids in the early hours of Tuesday.

    Rabindra Nath Nayak, chairman of the state-run Power Grid Corp. of India Ltd. said the company is working to restore normal power supply to all the affected regions.

    Power Grid operates all the five regional grids—or supply networks—into which India is divided. It runs more than 100,000 kilometers of electricity transmission lines.

    The northern, eastern and northeastern grids, all of which failed Tuesday, have a combined peak-hour load of about 46,000 megawatts.

    On Monday, the northern grid had failed, affecting power supply in nine provinces for the worst outage in northern India for 10 years.

    Coal-based power plants at NTPC Ltd., India's largest power generator by capacity, stopped operating for several hours Tuesday, Chairman Arup Roy Choudhury said.

    The power outage came despite assurances from the power minister about normal electricity supply after Monday's grid failure. It reflects the South Asian nation's inability to supply its homes and businesses with sufficient power— a major concern for local and overseas investors, and a key worry for policy makers.

    Experts estimate that problems associated with India's creaky infrastructure —including roads and ports—shave off about two percentage points from its gross domestic product growth.

    This makes a speedy overhaul of the power infrastructure crucial to boosting economic growth. But efforts by India to build new power plants haven't yet yielded much result because of a shortage of coal.

    More than half of India's power generation capacity of 205 gigawatts is coal-based, and Coal India Ltd., the world's biggest coal producer, is unable to produce enough because of delays in getting environmental clearances for mining.

    An ambitious program to build nuclear power plants has faced public protests, especially after the nuclear accident in Fukushima, Japan, last year.

    Government giveaways in the form of free electricity to farmers and a reluctance among politicians to raise power charges to sufficiently cover costs have drained cash reserves from the largely state-run electricity distribution companies, leaving them with mounting debt.

    India aims to expand its power generation capacity by 44% over the next five years. In June, power generation fell short by 5.8% of the peak hour demand of 128 gigawatts, according to government data.

    The government has announced the appointment of a three-member panel to investigate the cause for Monday's power failure in northern India. The committee will submit its report in two weeks.

    The committee comprises Arvinder Singh Bakshi, chairman of the Central Electricity Authority, India's power sector monitoring agency; Power Grid's Mr. Nayak; and S. K. Soonee, chief executive of the state-run Power System Operation Corp.

    Chandrajit Banerjee, director general of the Confederation of Indian Industry lobby group, described the two outages as a "telling commentary on the situation of the power sector in the country."

    He said businesses incurred hundreds of millions of dollars in losses Tuesday, "which pales into insignificance when compared to the difficulty that the people of the country have had to face."

    Mr. Banerjee said the grid failures on two consecutive days "have created a huge dent in the country's reputation."

    The exact reasons for Tuesday's power failure weren't immediately know, but Power Grid's Mr. Nayak said that "tripping at several inter-connectivity points of the [northern] grid could have had a cascading effect."

    He added: "Even before we could figure out the reason for yesterday's failure, we had more grid failures today."

    By Tuesday evening, up to 80% of power supply had been restored in northern India and up to 45% in eastern India, a spokesman for Power Grid said. In northeastern India, full power supply has resumed.

    "We are on track to [restoring supply] fully to all the regions as soon as possible," the spokesman said.

    This will come as a huge relief, with the effects of Tuesday's outage spreading to mines, hospitals and even crematoriums.

    About 200 miners were stranded in an underground mine in eastern India as their elevators were stuck due to the power disruption. All the miners were later safely rescued, said Niladri Roy, general manager of Eastern Coalfields Ltd., a unit of Coal India Ltd.—the world's largest producer of the fuel.

    At a coal mine run by Bharat Coking Coal Ltd., another unit of Coal India, about 70 miners were trapped, of which about 20 were rescued by evening, a senior company executive said. He added that the remaining about 50 workers will be rescued with the help of emergency power backup.

    At Nigambodh Ghat, a crematorium in the national capital of New Delhi, a total of three dead bodies were cremated using wood after the electricity failed, an official said.

    The All-India Institute of Medical Sciences, one of Delhi's main state-run hospitals, ran its diesel generators for almost two hours until power supply resumed, spokesman Y.K. Gupta said. Another hospital, Guru Teg Bahadur Hospital, was worse off: "There has been no electricity for the last 11 hours," a duty officer at the hospital said. "Only emergency operations can be performed."

    A spokeswoman for GAIL (India) Ltd., the country's largest natural-gas distributor by sales, said power stations drew less natural gas Tuesday.

    Earlier in the day, Power Minister Sushilkumar Shinde said efforts are continuing to resume supply at the earliest, especially to essential services.

    Later, the government announced that Mr. Shinde will take over as the next home minister of India. The power portfolio has been given as an additional charge to Corporate Affairs Minister Veerappa Moily.

    The moves are not linked to the power failure, but part of a reshuffle of ministers to allow Home Minister P. Chidambaram to take over the finance portfolio.

    Power Fails Again in India - WSJ.com
     
  8. INDIC

    INDIC BANNED

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2012
    Messages:
    18,523
    Ratings:
    +1 / 15,548 / -12
    Country:
    India
    Location:
    India
    See your country name before commenting.
     
  9. MBI Munshi

    MBI Munshi PDF THINK TANK: ANALYST

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2007
    Messages:
    8,579
    Ratings:
    +5 / 5,120 / -0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Location:
    Bangladesh
    You mean Bangladesh (the real superpower)
     
  10. jagjitnatt

    jagjitnatt SENIOR MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2010
    Messages:
    2,136
    Ratings:
    +0 / 2,231 / -0
    ^^^^^^^^:lol:

    Bangladesh and super power....

    We aren't practicing antonyms mr Munshi.
     
  11. INDIC

    INDIC BANNED

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2012
    Messages:
    18,523
    Ratings:
    +1 / 15,548 / -12
    Country:
    India
    Location:
    India
    superpower Bangladesh!!!
    [​IMG]
     
  12. angeldude13

    angeldude13 BANNED

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2011
    Messages:
    797
    Ratings:
    +0 / 506 / -2
    Country:
    India
    Location:
    India
    i thought it was kind of fire sale like in the movie die hard 4.0.metro and traffic signal down,massive road jams and rain
     
  13. MBI Munshi

    MBI Munshi PDF THINK TANK: ANALYST

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2007
    Messages:
    8,579
    Ratings:
    +5 / 5,120 / -0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Location:
    Bangladesh
    Superpower India!!!

    [​IMG]
     
  14. Mercenary

    Mercenary ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2006
    Messages:
    3,202
    Ratings:
    +1 / 3,411 / -0
    Country:
    Pakistan
    Location:
    Canada
    ISI was behind this power outage :D
     
  15. IndoCarib

    IndoCarib ELITE MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2011
    Messages:
    9,456
    Ratings:
    +1 / 13,157 / -4
    Country:
    India
    Location:
    Antigua And Barbuda

    What about this ? Are china, US not super powers ?? Can you dare mock them ??

    Aug. 14, 2003: The worst U.S. blackout. Power line problems in the Midwest trigger a cascade of breakdowns that cut power to 50 million people in eight states and Canada, some for more than a day


    January-February 2008: Winter storms cause a nearly two-week blackout to about 4 million people around the central Chinese city of Chenzhou. Eleven technicians reportedly die trying to restore power.